CABINETMAKING & WOOD TECHNOLOGY
Required Skills/Job & Salary Outlook

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Required Skills/Job & Salary Outlook

Cut, shape, and assemble wooden articles or set up and operate a variety of woodworking machines, such as power saws, jointers, and mortisers to surface, cut, or shape lumber or to fabricate parts for wood products.

 

Sample of reported job titles

Cabinet Maker, Cabinet Assembler, Frame Builder, Machine Operator, Cabinet Builder, Cabinet Installer, Cutter, Double End Tenon Operator, Framer, Router Operator


Tasks

·         Produce or assemble components of articles, such as store fixtures, office equipment, cabinets, or high-grade furniture.

·         Verify dimensions or check the quality or fit of pieces to ensure adherence to specifications.

·         Set up or operate machines, including power saws, jointers, mortisers, tenoners, molders, or shapers, to cut, mold, or shape woodstock or wood substitutes.

·         Measure and mark dimensions of parts on paper or lumber stock prior to cutting, following blueprints, to ensure a tight fit and quality product.

·         Reinforce joints with nails or other fasteners to prepare articles for finishing.

·         Attach parts or subassemblies together to form completed units, using glue, dowels, nails, screws, or clamps.

·         Establish the specifications of articles to be constructed or repaired or plan the methods or operations for shaping or assembling parts, based on blueprints, drawings, diagrams, or oral or written instructions.

·         Cut timber to the right size and shape and trim parts of joints to ensure a snug fit, using hand tools, such as planes, chisels, or wood files.

·         Match materials for color, grain, or texture, giving attention to knots or other features of the wood.

·         Trim, sand, or scrape surfaces or joints to prepare articles for finishing.


Tools used in this occupation

·         Hand clamps — Bar clamps; Cam clamps; Quick-release clamps; Wedge clamps

·         Planes — Block planes; Jointer planes; Shapers; Smooth planes

·         Power routers — Panel routers; Plunge routers; Portable routers; Table routers

·         Power saws — Circular saws; Panel saws; Reciprocating saws; Sliding panel saws

·         Wood chisels — Bowl gouges; Morticers; Skew chisels; Spokeshaves


Technology used in this occupation

·         Computer aided design CAD software

·         Data base user interface and query software — Data entry software

·         Electronic mail software — Microsoft Outlook

·         Facilities management software — Computerized maintenance management system CMMS software

·         Project management software — Computer estimation software


Knowledge

·         Design — Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

·         Mechanical — Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

·         Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

·         Production and Processing — Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.


Skills

·         Operation Monitoring — Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

·         Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

·         Quality Control Analysis — Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

·         Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.

·         Operation and Control — Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

·         Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.

·         Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.

·         Operations Analysis — Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.

·         Repairing — Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

·         Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others.


Abilities

·         Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.

·         Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.

·         Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.

·         Reaction Time — The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.

·         Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.

·         Trunk Strength — The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.

·         Multilimb Coordination — The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.

·         Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

·         Static Strength — The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.

·         Far Vision — The ability to see details at a distance.


Work Activities

·         Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

·         Controlling Machines and Processes — Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

·         Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

·         Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

·         Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings — Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

·         Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

·         Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

·         Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment — Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

·         Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People — Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

·         Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.


Work Context

·         Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — How much does this job require using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls?

·         Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — How much does this job require wearing common protective or safety equipment such as safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets?

·         Spend Time Standing — How much does this job require standing?

·         Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled — How often does this job require working indoors in non-controlled environmental conditions (e.g., warehouse without heat)?

·         Exposed to Contaminants — How often does this job require working exposed to contaminants (such as pollutants, gases, dust or odors)?

·         Exposed to Hazardous Equipment — How often does this job require exposure to hazardous equipment?

·         Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?

·         Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — How often does this job require working exposed to sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable?

·         Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?

·         Structured versus Unstructured Work — To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals?


Interests

Interest code: RC

·         Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

·         Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.


Work Styles

·         Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.

·         Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.

·         Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

·         Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

·         Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

·         Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.

·         Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.

·         Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

·         Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.

·         Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.


Work Values

·         Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

·         Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

·         Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.


State and National Wages & Employment Trends

Location

Pay
Period

2011

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

United States

Hourly

$9.51

$11.74

$14.68

$18.23

$22.62

Yearly

$19,800

$24,400

$30,500

$37,900

$47,000

Pennsylvania

Hourly

$11.24

$13.39

$16.22

$19.02

$24.34

Yearly

$23,400

$27,900

$33,700

$39,600

$50,600

 

United States

Employment

Percent
Change

Job Openings 1

2010

2020

Cabinetmakers and Bench Carpenters

97,000

113,300

+17%

4,020

Pennsylvania

Employment

Percent
Change

Job Openings 1

2008

2018

Cabinetmakers and Bench Carpenters

5,700

4,600

-20%

170

1Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.


Note: The data for the State Employment Trends and the National Employment Trends are not directly comparable. The projections period for state data is 2008-2018, while the projections period for national data is 2010-2020.

Information provided by CareerOneStop, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration