COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

  • Classes are listed alphabetically by course number. 
  • Choose the first letter of the course number to go to that section for Technical Fields, General Education Courses, or Developmental Courses.
  • Select the name of the School of Study above each course section to view all information for that degree. 

Technical Courses                          A  B  C  E  G  H  M  P  R  S

  General Education Courses                                C  E  H  M  P S
  Pre-Major Courses                                                            ALL

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY (ARCH)
ARCH 106  (3 credits) Fundamentals of  Architectural Drafting

Serves as an introduction to architectural drafting. Focuses on communication of design concepts and instructions to builders. Investigation and analysis of drawings and other means to communicate architecture. Exploration and development of an individual’s communication of ideas and thoughts by means of graphic representation.

ARCH 111  (3 credits) Materials of Construction
Presents fundamental aspects of the design profession.
Involves the application and technology of materials. An appreciation of the limits and the potentials of materials is fundamental to well-executed designs. Investigation and analysis of actual materials and their application as a means to give form and substance to creative ideas.

ARCH 116  (3 credits) Residential Details
Research of specific building elements necessary for construction. Application of knowledge and creativity in the development of details. Typical and standard details applicable to residential construction. Learning how to communicate with the construction crew. Involves sketch details and drafted details. Also requires drawings and exercises showing typical details and drafting skills.

ARCH 121 (3 credits) Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD)
Intensive introduction to CAD including computer literacy, hardware, software, input, output, and printing. Includes current AutoCAD® (the industry standard software program), introductory computer drafting skills, and completion of specific drawing exercises. Students focus on AutoCAD® working for designers. Use of CAD to draw architectural elements such as floor plans, Zghting, furniture, wall treatments, and other such elements.

ARCH 156 (2 credits) Specifications, Estimating, and Contracts
Introduction to three important aspects of architectural technology: construction specifications, estimating, and design services contracts. Students learn about the differences between residential, commercial, and federal specifications. The basics of cost estimating for construction also incorporated. Also covered is simple cost estimates using calculators and computers. Students learn about the provisions that make up typical design services and construction contracts; the legal language; the link between contracts; government regulations; and working drawings.

ARCH 161 (4 credits) Working Drawings
The capstone course where students design their own houses. Creating a complete set of working drawings including site plans, floor plans, elevations, building sections, wall sections, details, and schedules. Preparing preliminary presentation drawings; creating a presentation model and a structural model; and preparing a full set of working drawings. CAD used to prepare all drawings.

ARCH 166  (2 credits) Rendering and Illustrations 
Students learn how to use perspective, color, shadow, and computer-aided animation and rendering to illustrate architectural design. Work in this course builds on skills explored in previous courses.
Prerequisite: ARCH 106

ARCH 171   (3 credits) Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) Applications  
An intensive follow-up to ARCH 121. Using AutoCAD® for efficient production of architectural drawings. Completes the development of a solid foundation of CAD skills designed to give the student appropriate entry level CAD skills. Prerequisite: ARCH 121

ARCH 206  (4 credits) Advanced Methods & Materials of Construction
Detailed investigation of commercial construction systems with a more in-depth review of construction materials than introduced in the first year. Materials considered in a systems approach, including floor, wall, roof, glazing, and finish systems. Selected criteria of cost, installation, long-term material performance, limitations, and whole-building integration identified for individual materials. Prerequisite: ARCH 161

ARCH 211  (2 credits) Structural Systems
Historical development of structures. Includes the loads and stability of structures. Identifies various stresses, including tension, compression, sheer, and bending. Looks at design requirements, characteristics, limitations, and rules of thumb utilizing wood, steel, and concrete systems; analyzes beams, columns, frames, trusses, and connection components and details in structural design.

ARCH 216  (3 credits) Site and Microclimate Design
Specified site parameters and impact on building design from site investigation to finished project. Review initial design concerns, site vegetation, terrain, winds, waterways, solar access, and seasonal effects. Building design issues are landscaping, grading and drainage, site utilities, paving and roadways, and site amenities.

ARCH 256 (2 credits)   
Environmental Systems 

Theory, history, design and explanation of systems affecting building environmental quality. Includes review of plumbing, water, and sanitary systems; the options available in the selection of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems; and an energy overview (thermal control, heat load analysis, utilization of solar alternatives, and understanding of indoor air quality concerns). Electrical equipment requirements and loads, artificial and natural lighting and illumination criteria and fixtures are covered, as well as acoustical control construction practices and vertical transportation impact on building design.

ARCH 261 (2 credits) Life Safety and Building Codes
Philosophy and approaches to life safety, including fire protection systems and the impact of various types of construction on life safety. Traces evolution of building codes and analyzes the building code compliance of various hypothetical case studies. Covers means of egress and construction system assemblies. Reviews barrier-free design requirements and implication on project design.

ARCH  266  (1 credit) Architectural History and Theories of  Design

Overview of architecture, from prehistoric to the 20th century and beyond, including Ancient, Middle Ages, Renaissance, Eastern, Colonial, and Modern. Stylistic characteristics of historical architecture reviewed and analyzed with specific concentration on American architecture. Includes history of urban design and the current changing face of the building environment, from city and suburb to farm.

ARCH  271  (4 credits) Individual Design Studio
Utilization of material learned throughout the previous three semesters. Student selects commercial/institutional building type and designs the entire building, from initial design concept to completion of construction documents. Student is responsible for building programming, square footage requirements, design concept, and integration of site, architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical considerations. Finished project will include a written building program, construction drawings, outline specification, and presentation graphics.

ARCH 276 (2 credits)  Group Design Studio
Project simulates a “real world” approach to professional practice by involving the design of a hypothetical renovation and addition to an existing campus building. Small student teams are responsible for delegating all project tasks and monitoring project deadlines and completion dates. At the end a group effort will include initial design concept, construction budget estimates, construction drawings, outline specifications, and presentation graphics. disassembly, measurements, and reassembly on actual engines take place.

ARCH 320 (3 credits) Understanding Greece: Art, Architecture History, Mythology
A twelve-day guided tour of architectural sites in Greece. The focus is on understanding the contribution of Greece to Western architecture.  Studying architecture exposes students to the social, political, economic, and technological history of Greece.  Introductory lectures prepare students before the course, which will be offered at the end of the spring term.

ARCH 340 (3 credit) Understanding Italy’s History Through Its Art and Architecture
A ten-day guided tour of architectural sites in Italy. The focus is on understanding the contribution of Italy to Renaissance art and architecture.  Studying art and architecture exposes students to the social, political, economic, and technological history of Italy.  Introductory lectures prepare students before the course, which will be offered during the spring break of the spring term.
 
ARCH 360 (3 credits) Understanding Spain’s History Through Its Art and Architecture
A ten-day guided tour of architectural and cultural sites of Spain. The focus is on understanding the contribution of Spain to world of art and architecture. Studying art and architecture exposes students to the social, political, religious, economic, and technological history of Spain.  Introductory lectures prepare students before the course, which will be offered during the spring break of the spring semester. 
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AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AT)                        
AT 106 (2 credits) Automotive Service Fundamentals

Automotive service fundamentals presents an overview of the automotive industry, including an introduction to the automobile and its systems. Jobs in the automotive service field are covered. Shop work, service information and how to find it, will be discussed. Electronic information systems “Mitchell 1” and “All Data” will be utilized. Safety in the auto shop, including the proper use of basic hand and common power tools, is demonstrated. Environmental protection is taught, including recycling and the proper use and approved disposal methods of common automotive shop chemicals will be discussed. Demonstrations and hands-on training in common automotive shop practices, i.e., tube flaring, thread construction and repair. Fasteners, including “torque to yield” are thoroughly covered. Measurement systems, USC and metric, are discussed, including hands-on training using all common automotive precision measurement tools i.e. micrometers, dial indicators, and torque wrenches, to name a few. The theory and servicing of automotive rolling bearings, will be covered, wheel bearings will be
emphasized.

AT 111 (4 credits) Internal Combustion Engine Service  
This course covers the basic theory, design, and operating fundamentals of spark ignition piston engines. Extensive mechanical testing and diagnostic procedures are demonstrated, including compression and vacuum testing utilizing “wave form analysis” with lab scopes. Power balance, including both intrusive and non intrusive will be demonstrated. Running, and snap-throttle compression testing will be featured. Methods to check valve timing on pushrod and overhead cam engines will be demonstrated. Engine lubrication systems and automotive lubricants are studied, diagnostic and test procedures will be performed. Engine cooling systems, theory, and standard service procedures are also included. Machining of engine components and restoring of all tolerances will be covered. Cylinder head servicing is performed, and the “three angle cut” method is used. Complete disassembly, all precession measurements, component servicing, resealing and reassembly on actual engines takes place.Prerequisite: AT 106

AT 116   (3 credits) Chassis Service/Steering and Suspension
The basic theory and operating principles of automotive suspension and steering systems are studied; service, repair and diagnostic procedures are featured. Tire and wheel service and computer balancing are performed by students. The Hunter road force wheel balancer and vibration solver model 9700 is featured. Even the widest tires mounted on the newest custom wheels will be no problem when learning to use the Hunter model TS3500 tire changer. The safe and proper method of air bag module handling will be taught. Wheel alignment principles are covered, including both the simple basic maintenance wheel alignment, and the more complicated diagnostic wheel alignment. Complex alignment factors such as, tire scrub radius, included angle, and steering axis inclination, will be covered in depth. Hands-on tire and wheel servicing, pre-alignment inspections, and wheel alignment measurements are taken on “live” vehicles.

AT 156 (3 credits) Automotive Brake Systems
Modern automotive brake systems and their operating principles is studied and standard repair and service procedures are performed. Drum, disc/drum, and four-wheel disc systems are featured. Power-assist systems and parking brake systems are included. An introduction to the theory and servicing of antilock brake systems, including first generation Bosch type, and the newest non-integral systems are included. Trouble code retrieval and onboard diagnostics using scan tools, will be featured.

AT 161  (4 credits) Automotive Electrical/Electronic Principles
The theory of electricity (including Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’’s Law, series and parallel circuits, AC and DC current flow), is studied. Basic test meter procedures are featured, and solid state devices, integrated circuits, and on-board microcomputers are explained. Automotive wiring and common automotive accessory systems are studied and servicing and repair procedures performed. Automotive batteries, their construction, theory of operation, and standard service procedures are also included. Hands-on extensive electrical system service is performed using digital volt ohm meters, and automotive lab scopes. The PDI DVOM is featured, and the Fluke 98 Series II, Vetronix Master Tech, and the cutting edge Vetronix MTS 5100/5200 lab/ignition scopes are also featured. Low resolution amp clamps from Fluke and Vetronix will allow students to experience the latest diagnostics using the latest AMP RAMPING diagnostic procedures! New material has been incorporated into the electrical and fuel and emissions courses after the instructors attended driveability training/seminars hosted by such nationally recognized “gurus” as; Jim Linder of Linder Technical Services, Indianapolis; Bill Fulton of Ohio, Jerry Truglia of New York; Dan Marrinucci of Motor Magazine; and Mac Vanden Brink of Michigan.

AT 166 (4 credits) Engine Electrical/Electronic Principles   
Cranking circuits and starter motors, charging systems, alternators and voltage regulators, and ignition systems (DIS, & EI, including C.O.P./coil on plug) are studied. Simulators are featured to help students better understand system operation. Construction, theory of operation, standard service procedures, and system malfunction diagnosis are covered using the latest test equipment (the new Vetronix 5100/5200 lab scope/engine analyzers, and the Fluke 98 series II will be featured.). Hands-on comprehensive testing procedures are performed on “live” vehicles. One of the major goals of this course is for students to gain skills in problem solving through the use of on-car testing, and diagnostic procedures. This course culminates with each student performing comprehensive tests on the engine mechanical condition, battery, cranking system, charging system, and the complete ignition system. This will be followed by a report analyzing good/bad results. Prerequisite: AT 111

AT 171   (4 credits) Fuel and Emission Systems
The principles of fuel systems are studied. Fuel delivery systems, along with fuel pump testing, are covered. The history of emission control systems, from their inception up to the present, is included. Control system theory and operating principles, are studied. Service and testing procedures are demonstrated, and on-car tests are performed on all the major emissions systems. The latest evaporative leak tester “smoke machines” that use nitrogen will be utilized for training. Standard and feedback carburetor operating principles are still briefly covered. Introduction to alternative fuels, electric and hybrid vehicles are presented. Highlights of the latest Pennsylvania Emission Testing procedures will be featured, and the ground work of “5-gas diagnostic testing” will be laid.

AT 206 (4 credits) Advanced Engine Diagnostics
Covers the use of the Vetronix MTS 5100 Engine Analyzer, Vacutec Leak Detector, and the Mustang Chassis Dynomometer. Theory-related instruction is given on 5-gas analysis and interpreting the results of the analyzer tests with special emphasis on how they relate to advanced diagnosis of ignition, carburetion, fuel injection, charging, cranking, and engine and emission control systems. Demonstrations on hook-up and operation are followed by student practice on shop vehicles, and when possible, by repair of client vehicles. Prerequisite: AT 166

AT 211  (3 credits) Advanced Chassis Service
The Hunter P611 four-wheel aligner featuring the DSP400 Series Sensors (cameras) and the DSP300 Series Sensors are used in this course. Theory-related instruction is given on alignment with special emphasis on 4-wheel alignment. Disc and drum brake machining along with applying nondirectional finishes on the Ammco brake lathe are covered. On the car rotor truing is covered featuring the Pro-Cut PFM-900 Smart Lathe. Demonstrations on hook-up and operation are followed by student practice on shop vehicles and when possible by repair of client vehicles.
Prerequisites: AT 116, AT 156

AT 216 (3 credits) Independent Diagnosis and Repair
Opportunity to diagnose and make repairs on clients’ vehicles in a simulated dealership atmosphere. Experience acting as shop forepersons, using and writing repair orders, ordering parts, and keeping track of hours on the job and using materials. All repairs relate to the courses taken.

AT 222 (2 credits) Pennsylvania Safety Inspection/Enhanced Emissions Inspection Certification 

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Vehicle Equipment and Inspections Regulation/Enhanced Emissions Inspector Manuals are covered, as per state requirements. A demonstration of the proper procedure for performing a safety inspection on a vehicle is given. Students practice on shop vehicles. Each student is given the opportunity to take the Pennsylvania Safety Inspection written and performance tests along with the Enhanced Emissions written test and computer-based training/tactile test. The Commonwealth, upon satisfactory completion of these tests, will grant a license for each.

AT 256 (2 credits) Heating and Air Conditioning
Covers the theory of refrigeration and the operating principles of manual and automatic temperature control systems, with special emphasis on diagnosis, service, and repair. Refrigerant recovery, recycling, identification, and recharging techniques on R-12 and R-134a systems are covered in accordance with federal law. The Sun Air-Kare charging station, Everco EREC Recovery/Recycle station, and the Robinair Enivro Charge Combination are featured. Demonstrations given on hook-up, operation, and servicing, followed by student practice on shop vehicles, training aids (clutch and seal replacement) and repair of client vehicles.

AT 261  (3 credits) Drive Train and Manual Transaxle Principles
Basic operating principles of manual transaxles, differentials, clutches, universal joints. C-V joints, drive axles, and drive shafts, along with diagnosis and basic service techniques. Demonstrations given on differential set-up, replacing universal and C-V joints, also clutch replacement and adjustment. Students practice disassembly, precision measurements, adjustments and assembly techniques on training aids, and work on client vehicles when possible.

AT 266  (3 credits) Advanced Engine Computer Control Analysis
Sensor-related theory, testing procedures, and waveform analysis are studied. OBD-II theory and the related testing procedures are covered. How to use shop manual to follow manufacturers’ procedures for troubleshooting engine drivability problems on computer-controlled cars, along with lab scopes (Fluke-98 Series II), break out boxes, and the Master Tech 3100 hand-held scanner are used to recover trouble codes from the computer’s memory and reading sensor stream data. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and the interpretation of the results. Students practice on shop vehicles and repair client vehicles if possible.

AT 271 (4 credits) Automatic Transaxle Service  
Basic principles of automatic transmissions, including lock-up torque converters, diagnosis, and basic service techniques. Chrysler 40TE electronic transaxle theory covered. Demonstrations given on pressure checks and shift points, using gauges and a chassis dynamometer. Students practice disassembly, precision measurements, testing, adjustments, and assembly techniques on training aids. Where possible, repair on client vehicles included.

AT 276 (3 credits) Fuel Injection Systems
The basic operating principles of the Bosch Mechanical Fuel Injection System along with Chrysler and G.M. throttle body and port systems are covered in this course. Special emphasis is placed on diagnosis and service techniques. The EMI-TECH fuel system analyzer is featured. Cleaning a fuel injection system on the vehicle is covered featuring the Bilstein EFI-800 Fuel system service center. Students practice on shop vehicles and work on client vehicles when possible.
Prerequisite: AT 171

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUAD)
BUAD 106  (3 credits) Accounting Principles I 
Introduction to the principles of accounting, the accounting cycle, the interpretation and recording of financial data, and the summarizing and reporting process. Emphasis is on the sole proprietor of a business. This course provides a foundation for further study in the accounting field.

BUAD 112 (3 credits) Business Document Production   
The structure of the course is designed to help students master Microsoft Word at the expert level for Microsoft Certification. The concepts and features of word processing are explored while students practice language arts skills through proofreading and editing. Additionally, students develop keyboarding speed and accuracy through various exercises that involve applications to business administration and personal life. 

BUAD 117 (3 credits) Introduction to Business
This course is designed to introduce students to the primary fields of business, and to inform them of the various career paths that they may pursue. The basic principles, forms, and practices involved in the administration of a modern business are examined. 

BUAD 121 Business Skills Lab (1 credit)
BUAD 171 Business Skills Lab (1 credit)
BUAD 226 Business Skills Lab (1 credit)
BUAD 271 Business Skills Lab (1 credit)

Work in a laboratory setting to complete program assignments and projects.  Develop computer and keyboarding skills through hands-on practice.  Students are introduced to various computer applications, including Publisher and QuickBooks.

BUAD 156 (3 credits) Principles of Accounting II
This course is a continuation of Accounting Principles I.  Instruction focuses on partnerships and corporations. Analysis and discussion of more complex financial concepts and statements are conducted.  Microsoft Excel® spreadsheets are used to prepare financial problems and statements.
Prerequisite: BUAD 106

BUAD 157 (3 credits) Principles of Marketing
An interactive approach to guide students in becoming better business people. The skills and responsibilities of planning, producing, pricing, promoting and distributing will be presented as an art and a science through realistic marketing situations and case studies.

BUAD 166 (3 credits) Business Computer Applications I
Microsoft Office programs (Excel®, Access®, PowerPoint®, and Outlook®) are studied in order for students to develop intermediate skills in spreadsheet, database, e-mail, and presentation applications.

BUAD 213 (3 credits) Introduction to Law and Business Law
Designed to give students an introduction to the sources of law, judicial process, and an overview of laws including criminal law, tort law, property law (including personal property, real estate, and landlord-tenant law), and wills, estates, and trusts. Also provides a basic understanding of contracts, sales and leases of goods, secured transactions, agency and employment law, and forms of business organizations.

BUAD 216   (3 credits) Office Procedures
Development of skills needed to function effectively in the daily operations of contemporary business offices. Prepare to work in the high-tech workplace and to assume a broad range of office communications, requiring excellent planning, organizing and critical thinking skills. An extensive capstone project, such as an office simulation, may be used in this course.

BUAD 217   (3 credits) Legal Office Procedures
Legal Office Procedures Development of skills needed in the daily operations of the legal office, e.g., organizing and prioritizing assignments, accurate task completion, using good judgment, and professionalism. Legal terminology and associated concepts are introduced.

BUAD 221 (3 credits) Organizational Behavior
This course is a study of workplace behaviors, structures and processes. Self-analysis and reflection are practiced in small groups through case studies, surveys, and discussion. Motivational theories and leadership styles are surveyed; decision making and business designs and cultures are investigated. 

BUAD 257 (3 credits) Electronic Commerce
Electronic Commerce Overview of emerging online technologies and trends and their influences on the electronic commerce marketplace.  Explores nature and impact of e-commerce on business operations, resources and mamangement. Upon completion of the course, students will have a firm grasp of global e-commerce business trends and the technologies required to implement them.

BUAD 266 (3 credits) Business Computer Applications II   
Students develop advanced computer skills in Microsoft Office® applications. Exercises based on real-life business situations give students hands-on experience in Excel®, PowerPoint®, Access®, and Outlook® programs. Lessons are structured to prepare students for Microsoft Certification testing at the Expert level and all courseware is Microsoft approved. Prerequisite: BUAD 166

BUAD 267 (3 credits) Human Resources Development
This course prepares students to work in administrative and management positions and serves as a basis of further study in the field of human resources management.  In accordance with suggested SHRM guidelines (Society for Human Resource Management), both personal competencies and business policies are addressed in this course.

BUAD 276 (3 credits) Business Communications
A practice in writing and editing of business communications practice in writing, revising and editing
business communications, including memos, business letters, e-mail messages, reports and job-search documents. The ability to convey information in a clear, concise manner is developed along with critical thinking and communication skills.

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CABINETMAKING AND WOOD TECHNOLOGY (CABM)
CABM 106 (4 credits) Hand Tools and Portable Power Tools
Students will study the wide variety of hand tools, building a thorough foundation in hand tool usage, maintenance, and sharpening. They will learn the basics of hand joinery. Students will also develop an understanding for the capabilities and proper usage of portable power tools. This knowledge will be applied to various projects. 

CABM 111 (4 credits) Furniture Construction I
This course provides a foundation for the construction of various types of cabinetry and furniture. The course includes an overview of wood characteristics and joinery methods, assembly, abrasives, adhesives, and veneering basics. Machinery maintenance, safety, and usage will be stressed as well. Construction projects will aid in developing an understanding of the subject matter. 

CABM 116 (1 credit) Finishing I
This class will focus on surface preparation and the proper use of finish materials.  Various methods of application, including wiping, brushing and spraying, will be addressed.  During this introductory course, students will apply a wax, shellac and lacquer finish on the projects completed in class. 

CABM 121 (2 credits) Related Drawing I
An introduction to basic blueprint reading and drafting techniques applicable to the cabinetmaking profession.

CABM 151 (3 credits) Advanced Machinery 
This course teaches the proper set-up and use of the hollow-chisel and slot mortiser, shaper, single-end tenoner, wide-belt sander and panel saw. The course will also provide an in-depth look at the various types of cutters and cutter-heads available for the shaper. Additional machines will be added to fit project requirements and available time.
Prerequisite: CABM 106

CABM 156 (4 credits) Furniture Construction II
Students will take a more in-depth look at wood properties, joinery, and construction methods. An emphasis will be placed on precision machining techniques and strategies for producing molding and other furniture and case components. Other topics will include door and drawer construction and styles, hardware and its applications, and an introduction to furniture styles and types. The construction of various furniture projects will help solidify the subject matter. Prerequisite: CABM 111   

CABM 161 (1 credit) Finishing II 
The finishing course involves the final preparation of wood surfaces and the selection and application of appropriate finishing materials. Topics will include dyes and pigmented stains, a variety of sealers and topcoating materials, as well as spray finishing techniques.Prerequisite: CABM 116

CABM 166 (1 credit) Job Management
This course provides an overview of estimating, cost analysis, and methods of job documentation. Students will maintain daily time cards as well as job folders for their various furniture projects. Job folders will contain drawings; route and cut sheets; time and cost analysis sheets; bill of materials; materials invoice; and a finishing schedule. Prerequisite: CABM 111

CABM 171 (2 credits) Related Drawing I
A further study into basic blueprint reading and drafting techniques applicable to the cabinetmaking profession as introduced in CABM 121. Prerequisite: CABM 121

CABM 206 (6 credits) Advanced Wood Project
From an existing plan of their choice, students will
construct and finish advanced pieces of furniture. This course emphasizes individual planning and problem solving. Students will construct their own jigs and fixtures as well as machine set-ups. All projects require an existing set of plans and the approval of the instructor before starting. Students are responsible for supplying the necessary materials, hardware, and finishing supplies required for the project. Prerequisites: CABM 111, 151, 156, 161 

CABM 211 (1 credit) Machine Maintenance
To develop the skills necessary to grind jointer and planer knives, sharpen shaper cutters, and clean and lubricate a variety of common woodworking machines. Prerequisite: CABM 151

CABM 221 (4 credits) Architectural Millwork
This course will expose students to the field of custom
architectural millwork. Emphasis will be placed on the student developing an understanding of the Architectural Woodworking Quality Standards as developed by the Architectural Woodwork Institute. A large portion of the course will be devoted to live work in which students produce the millwork items required for the housing project and other related campus work.
Prerequisites: CABM 111, CABM 151, CABM 156 

CABM 226 (1 credit) Custom Woodworking Cutters  
The student will learn how to design, draw, make a
template, and grind two matching cutters for the shaper. Prerequisite: CABM 151

CABM 251 (1 credit) Shop Operations and Management  
This course stresses the fundamentals of ordering, purchasing, estimating, scheduling production, and general management techniques. Prerequisite: CABM 151 

CABM 261 (3 credits) Kitchen Cabinet Planning and Estimating 
The student will learn how to plan, draw, estimate the cost, and list the materials and supplies for the kitchen cabinets and vanities that will be used in the housing project.
Prerequisites: CABM 121, CABM 171

CABM 263 (4 credits) Kitchen Cabinet Construction  
As follow-up to CABM 261, this course emphasizes the machining, construction, and finishing of the kitchen cabinets, vanities, and trim used in the housing project.
Prerequisites: CABM 111, CABM 151, CABM 156, CABM 206

CABM 265 (2 credits) Cabinet Installation
This course involves site preparation and the installation of kitchen cabinets and bathroom vanities. Emphasis will be placed on the NKBA’s (National Kitchen and Bath Association) Installation Manuals. Prerequisites: CABM 106, CABM 263

CABM 267  (2 credits) Counter Top Fabrication
This course involves the fabrication of high pressure plastic laminate and solid surface countertops. Exposure to other types of countertop materials will be included. Prerequisite: CABM 106

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CARPENTRY TECHNOLOGY (CARP)
CARP 106  (3 credits) Hand Tools and Power Tools
This course is a general introduction to the basic tools that are used by a carpenter with an emphasis on safety, proper usage and procedures, and various applications that are most commonly used in the carpentry trades.

CARP 111 (3 credits) Building Materials
Covering the wide range of building materials used in carpentry, this course examines the many different types of wood products used to the newest technology of steel framing. Proper procedures for estimating these building materials to the variety of fastening methods will also be discussed. 

CARP 116 (3 credits) Site Work and Foundations I
In this course, students will learn how to set up and operate the builder’s level and level transit. Building layout and excavation of residential construction will be explained, with particular emphasis on building stake-off. Types of footers, foundations, and concrete forming will also be explored.

CARP 156 (4 credits) Floor, Wall, and Ceiling Framing  
With a strong emphasis on platform framing, students will examine the proper methods of constructing subfloors, walls, and ceilings in the framework of light construction.

CARP 161  (2 credits) Stair Construction
Students will learn the different types of stairways and all parts pertaining to them. They will also learn how to calculate, lay out, and construct stairway stringers with their proper landings, risers, treads, and railings.

CARP 166 (3 credits) Roof Framing and Materials  
The different types of roof systems and all the material members that are involved in the different roof types are discussed. Students will learn theoretically how to calculate rafters to fit their proper situations and practice laying out and cutting common and hip rafters. 

CARP 176  (2 credits) Exterior and Interior Finish
Students are introduced to the different methods of exterior and interior wall finish and trim work. For exterior walls, particular attention is given to vinyl siding; for interior walls, attention is focused upon drywall. Both thermal and sound insulation are examined to gain an understanding of insulation principles and common installation practices. For interior trim, students will practice hanging doors as well as learning proper installation procedures for the large variety of interior trim stock available today.

CARP 182  (3 credits) Construction Drawing and Blueprint Reading
In this course, students will learn how to read and dissect a set of blueprints and become familiar with blueprint symbols and their associations. Students will also become very involved in drawing various details from blueprints, such as plan views, elevation views, and section views. This will aid in understanding the construction drawings and the many different scales used in current architectural drafting designs.

CARP 207  (2 credits) Floor Construction
Covers both dimensional and engineered lumber applications. To meet current building designs and codes, students will perform installation from a detailed blueprint for sill plates, joists, joist hangers, stair beams, sub flooring and stair stringer construction.

CARP 209  (3 credits) Wall Construction
Covers both dimensional and engineered lumber applications. To meet current building designs and codes, students will perform installation and layout from a
detailed blueprint for wall plates, stud size and spacing, header design and size and rough opening sizes for window and door schedules. 

CARP 218 (3 credits) Roof Construction
Covers engineered trusses and hand framed rafters with ceiling joists. The students will become familiar with the installation and design criteria of an engineered truss including detailed truss drawings for field applications and the codes applying to field modifications. Students will perform layout, cutting and installing roof rafters from a detailed blueprint including proper ceiling joists, collar ties and gable overhang construction and codes. Students will install roof sheeting and fascia boards.

CARP 219  (1 credit) Thermal Insulation
Covers the various types of insulation for thermal, noise and fire protection. Ventilation baffles, vapor barriers and types of loose fill insulation will be detailed. Students will perform installation of insulation for wall, ceiling and fire-stop applications.

CARP 222 (2 credits) Exterior Finish and Trim
Covers the exterior materials used for siding, roofing, flashing and aluminum trim. Using accepted methods students will perform siding, soffit, fascia and fiberglass shingle applications, including proper flashing and counter flashing techniques.

CARP 226  (1 credit) Drywall Installation and Finish  
Covers the types and sizes of drywall installed in construction. In addition, proper hanging and finishing Site techniques will be covered. Students will perform installation and finishing methods for standard applications.

CARP 257  (2 credits) Stair Trim
Covers the variety and designs of interior custom stair trim. Students are instructed in the different stair designs, building codes and the perspective trim applications. Students install custom stair trim for an open stair and box stair designs including over the tread skirt board applications. 

CARP 267 (3 credits) Interior Finish and Trim
Covers the various interior painting and staining finishes. The proper wood types and species, finishing methods and applications are detailed. Details of interior pre-hung doors, window trim including extension jambs and sills are covered. Students perform the installation of a standard trim package.

CARP 272  (2 credits) Site Work and Foundations II  
Covers the details associated with site preparation and foundation inspections for a new building. Specifics are for lot size, set back, rite-of-way and building location. work includes using various instruments for batter board installations, excavation of foundation, locating footer elevation, forming and pouring footers. Locating, forming and pouring of sidewalks and exterior porches.

CARP 276  (3 credits) Residential Remodeling
Covers the details and techniques used for residential
remodeling and restoration. Students will perform demolition, repair and update existing structures to current building codes. The topics covered can include kitchens, bathrooms, flooring and exterior finishes.

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COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY (CORT)
CORT 106  (1 credit) Details of Body Construction
Different types of automobile bodies and how they are made at the factory. Covered are the locations of body joints and parts and the proper methods for parts removal and replacement.

CORT 111 (4 credits)  Collision Repair Welding  
Designed to prepare Collision Repair Students in the use of a MIG welder and the various uses of oxyacetylene equipment for cutting and heating to normalize and shrink metal. Proper use of equipment is stressed.

CORT 116  (4 credits) Repairing Damaged Panels and Metalworking Methods
Use of proper tools and techniques to bend sheet metal. Direct and indirect damage are explained along with ways damage can be corrected.

CORT 156 (4 credits) Introduction to Refinishing Procedures
Refinishing and the use of tools operated by compressed air. Proper use of various finish materials: primers, sealers, and thinners. Masking and spray painting techniques also covered.

CORT 162 (1 credit) Panel Replacement, Adjustment, and Corrosion Protection
Proper removal and replacement of panels will be stressed as well as the proper alignment of panels. A general overview of determining repair procedures, inspecting areas for hidden damage, removal of damaged panels, and corrosion protection.

CORT 166  (4 credits) Introduction to Frame Alignment and Repair
Frame alignment and straightening is studied, including the use of gauges and frame straightening equipment needed to restore a damaged frame or body to factory specifications.

CORT 206 (1 credit) Shop Management
Essentials of shop management, including the concept of overhead and the importance of location and customer relations.

CORT 211 (1 credit) Estimating
Concerned with damage reports, showing overall cost of repairs, including labor, parts, and materials.

CORT 216  (9 credits) Frame and Body Straightening  
Stresses accuracy in fixture diagram reading and proper placement of fixtures when repairing a uni-body. Bench system and the universal measuring system are used.

CORT 256 (3 credits) Repairing Collision Damage  
Covers repair of badly damaged vehicles. Involves the pulling or pushing of vehicles to relieve pressure and stress to adjoining parts. Replacement welding techniques and parts and section replacement featured.

CORT 261 (3 credits) Refinishing Procedures
Surface preparation, types of paint, the art of matching and blending new paint into the old finish, and techniques of two-tone painting.

CORT 266  (3 credits) Student Project
Using own project, student will demonstrate proficiency in collision repair.

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COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY (CADT)
CADT 101 (3 credits) Fundamentals of Drafting 
This course develops the student’s ability to interpret orthographic views and to visualize shapes in three dimensions.  Students will also experience the basics of freehand sketching instrument drawing, lettering, geometric construction, and associated manual drafting techniques. Students will also be exposed to various areas of study throughout the CAD field including structural detailing, tooling, and electronics drafting.

CADT 112 (3 credits) Technical Drawing
A study of orthographic projection and drawing creation with applications in multiview drawings including sectioning and auxiliary views. Techniques in pictorial drawing are also used to convey orthographic views as pictorial representations. Corequisite:  CADT 101, 112 or instructor approval.

CADT 120 (3 credits) Introduction to AutoCAD® Applications
A practical application of 2D orthographic skills utilizing AutoCAD® integrating knowledge of software commands with drafting standards. Students will also experience dimensioning styles, templates, and symbols libraries. During the course, students will create a series of mechanical drawings. Corequisite:  CADT 101, CADT 112 or instructor approval.

CADT 130 (3 credits) Advanced AutoCAD® Applications
An advanced application of 2D orthographic skills utilizing AutoCAD® integrating knowledge of software commands with drafting standards. Students will also experience advanced 2D commands, system variables, symbols libraries, attributes, customization, and macros. During the course, students will create a series of mechanical working drawings packets. Prerequisites:  CADT 120 or instructor approval.

CADT 150 (3 credits) Introduction to AutoDesk Inventor® Applications
An AutoCAD Inventor® applications course with an emphasis on solid modeling parts and basic assemblies and the transition from 3D solid models to 2D working drawings. Prerequisites:  CADT 130 or instructor approval.

CADT 160 (3 credits) Advanced AutoDesk Inventor® Applications
An advanced AutoCAD Inventor® applications course with an emphasis on advanced modeling of parts, advanced assemblies and working drawings and the generation of 2D working drawings from the solid models. Add-on packages such as pipe & tube, sheet metal, weldments, and wire harness diagrams will be explored. Prerequisites:  CADT 150 or instructor approval.

CADT 167 (3 credits) Process Pipe Drafting
An intermediate drafting course covering the topics appropriate for reading and creating the working drawings necessary to instruct pipe fitters in the assembly of equipment for industrial processes.  This course includes a thorough review of process pipe drafting practices and practical applications of the symbology required to specify piping installations. 
Prerequisite:  CADT 101;  Corequisite:  CADT 160 or instructor approval

CADT 171 (3 credits) Processes of Manufacturing 
An introduction to the processes commonly employed in the conversion of raw materials into finished products.  This course provides the student with a solid understanding of the operations necessary to cast, mold, form, separate, condition, assemble, and apply surface finishes to manufactured products. Corequisite:  CADT 166

CADT 207 (3 credits) Geometric Tolerancing
A study of the ASME dimensioning guidelines including Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T).  This course emphasizes the creation and usage of the drafting symbology necessary to define the form, fit, and function of mechanical components.  Corequisite: CADT 211

CADT 211 (3 credits) Metals Fabrication Drafting
An intermediate drafting course covering the topics pertinent to reading and creating the working drawings necessary to instruct welders and metal fabricators in the creation of welded assemblies.  This course includes a thorough review of industrial welding drafting practices and practical applications of the symbology required to specify them in an assembly.
Prerequisite:  CADT 101;  Corequisite:  CADT 171

CADT 220 (3 credits) Introduction to SolidWorks® Applications
Intro to SolidWorks® applications course introduces the student to the  essential applications with an emphasis on how to use the SolidWorks® mechanical design software to build parametric models of parts and assemblies, and how to make drawings of those parts and assemblies. Prerequisites: CADT 101, CADT 162 or instructor approval.

CADT 230 (3 credits) Advanced SolidWorks® Applications
Advanced SolidWorks® applications course focuses on developing skills central to the successful use of SolidWorks® parametric software. It is designed for the SolidWorks user who has mastered the basics of parametric solid model design but needs to continue building skills for working with imported models, surface modeling, an introduction to FEA using Simulation software and model analysis with MotionWorks and PhotoWorks. Prerequisites: CADT 220 or instructor approval

CADT 250 (3 credits) Introduction to Pro/Engineer® Applications
Intro to Pro/Engineer® applications course introduces the student to the essential applications that focuses on learning core-modeling skills in this comprehensive, hands-on course. Topics include sketching, part modeling, assemblies, drawings, and basic model management techniques. The course also includes a comprehensive design project that enables to practice your new skills by creating realistic parts, assemblies, and drawings.  Prerequisites:  CADT 230 or instructor approval.

CADT 260 (3 credits) Advanced Pro/Engineer® Applications
Advanced Pro/Engineer® applications course focuses on developing skills central to the successful use of Pro/Engineer® parametric software. It is designed for the Pro/Engineer® user who has mastered the basics of parametric solid model design but needs to continue building skills for working with imported models, surface modeling, sheet metal models and Mechanism Design which permits the user to animate their assemblies in a mechanical fashion. Other skills covered are, Simplified Reps, Top Down Design, Flexible Components, Shrinkwrap feature, Skeletons models, Layouts and advanced drafting commands.  Prerequisites:  CADT 250 or instructor approval

CADT 266 (3 credits) Working Drawings
An advanced drafting course emphasizing the practices necessary to produce detail, sub-assembly, and full-assembly mechanical drawings for industrial applications.  Corequisites:  CADT 271 or instructor approval.

CADT 271 (3 credits) Power Transmission
A study of power transmission fundamentals, the related computations, and drafting methodologies.  Applications include drafting standards for utilizing bushings, keys, sheaves, belts, chains, clutches, and conveyor pulleys in working assembly drawings.  Prerequisites:  MATH 126, MATH 136,  Corequisites:  CADT 262 or instructor approval.

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COMPUTER AND NETWORK SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION (CNSA)
CNSA 107 (3 Credits) PC Hardware and Support Fundamentals    
Almost anyone can be trained to repair a PC, but to be good at PC maintenance students need to understand the internal operation of PC hardware and software components. In order to fully comprehend internal PC operation, students must first have a fundamental understanding of electricity and the numbering system that is used internally by all computers.
The language of computers is said to be “1’s and 0’s”—binary numbers. Inside of a computer, these binary numbers are represented using voltage levels. Computers are electronic devices and require electrical power to operate. For this reason, the course begins with an overview of electricity. The terms voltage, current, resistance and power are defined and explored. Ohm’s Law is introduced and used by the student to calculate current flows and voltage drops. Digital MultiMeters are used in the lab by each student to measure voltage, check for electrical continuity and to verify Ohm’s Law. After the electrical portion of the course is complete, students are drilled on binary and hexadecimal numbering systems and also on units of measurement such as megabyte and gigabyte.
 The primary portion of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the internal operation of modern PC systems. Critical topics include the fundamental hardware elements of a PC system—the CPU, data bases, instruction cycles, memory, magnetic and optical storage, BIOS, video, I/O systems and more. Included in this course is instruction on how to build, upgrade and troubleshoot personal computers. Students will build a working PC system from scratch in the lab. This course can be used as preparation for the industry certification exam COMPTIA A+ though it is not an official exam preparation course. 

CNSA 111 (3 Credits) Introduction to Networking
Networking refers to connecting computers together to share computing resources and to perform work. Networking is a complex task, and as with any complex problem, the easiest way to understand and manage a complex task is to break it down into smaller, simpler tasks. That’s what the OSI model does for networking, and for that reason the OSI model and network topologies are covered in detail in this course. Computers are most commonly networked together via Ethernet LANs, and this course will explore Ethernet LANs in detail. Ethernet topologies, frame types, collision domains, broadcast domains and evolution from the original CSMA/CD scheme is explored and then contrasted to today’s modern Ethernet switching LANs. Students design a switched Ethernet 10/100/1000 LAN by researching equipment features and pricing from Internetworking vendors.
 Many local area networks are connected to other local area networks across significant distances. Each network and device on a network needs a network identifier and a host identifier. These identifiers are commonly called IP addresses, and in this course IP addressing and IP subnetting are covered in extreme detail. Students will learn how a subnet mask defines the network portion and host portion of an IP address, how to subnet a class A, B or C network, and what registered and unregistered IP address space is. This course can be used as preparation for industry certification exams COMPTIA Network+ and Cisco’s CCNA exam though it is not an official exam preparation course. Prerequisite: CNSA 107

CNSA 117  (3 Credits) Analysis of TCP/IP and Local Area Networking    
TCP/IP is said to be the language of the Internet. It is also the language of most Local Area Networks. This course explores the TCP/IP protocol suite in detail—students will attend lecture on the various mechanisms within the TCP/IP protocol suite that allow computers to communicate with other computers on their own network or on other networks. Topics include ARP, ICMP, DNS, DHCP and TCP Operation details such as sequencing, acknowledgments and sliding window flow control. After lecture is complete students spend lab time capturing frames with a software protocol analyzer and verifying the behaviors they heard about in lecture. This course also provides extensive curriculum on the physical aspects of Local Area Networks—twisted pair cabling, optical fiber cables, patch panels, network wall outlets, etc. In the lab, students work extensively with both copper and fiber cabling to become proficient with a variety of cable termination practices. They learn how to internally cable a building and how to connect multiple buildings together into one large local area network. Students are given TYCO/AMP curriculum on premise cable installation and will have the opportunity to earn certification for premise cabling installation in the class. This course can be used as preparation for industry certification exams COMPTIA Network+ and Cisco’s CCNA exam though it is not an official exam preparation course.
 Prerequisite: CNSA 111

CNSA 123 (3 Credits) LAN Cabling and WAN Technologies
This course will provide detail of telecommunications technologies and the use of telecommunications in Wide Area Networks (WAN's). The course starts with the theory of circuit switching vs. packet switching and the history of telecommunications carriers. The course progresses with mainstream forms of telecommunications technologies such as T1 lines, Frame Relay, MPLS, Broadband and Cellular technologies. An overview of ISDN, Sonet and ATM  is also provided.

Interlaced with the telecommunications content of this course is the Tyco Electronics structured cabling certification installer course content. Students will learn how to terminate unshielded twisted pair (UTP) , shielded twisted pair (STP) and fiber optic cable.  Cabling standards and best cabling practices in the industry are covered. Hands-on cable termination and structured cabling installations occupy a significant portion of lab time in this course. Students will have the opportunity to earn Tyco Electronics certified premises cabling installation certification. 
Prerequisite: CNSA 117

CNSA 156 (3 Credits) Operating Systems I
Microsoft’s server operating systems continue to be the dominant mainstream network operating system in the information technology industry. In this course and the next course (Systems Administration I) students will get detailed lecture and hands-on experience with Microsoft’s most modern server operating system. Operating system internals and architecture are covered and include topics such as multitasking, processes, threads, kernel mode, and the Windows Registry.
 Practical hands-on exposure is included in the labs and begins with attended and unattended installation methods. Included in installation methods are imaging and cloning techniques for mass rollouts of server and client operating systems. The lecture and labs continue with configuration of file and print servers, securing files with share and NTFS permissions, disk management (including RAID), disaster recovery, and back-up methods. This course can be used as preparation for Microsoft Certification though it is not an official exam preparation course.  Prerequisite: CNSA 122

CNSA 161 (3 Credits) Systems Administration I
This course builds and continues where the previous course, Operating Systems I, left off. A systems administrator is the person in charge of the servers and client computers that are attached to a network. As a systems administrator, an individual is in charge of an organization’s most important asset—its information and data. Students learn how to manage servers and their services and how to create a reliable, secure user environment. It is in this course that students are introduced to active directory and come to understand the difference between a security accounts manager (local user database) and the active directory (domain-based user database). Students learn how to manage the network clients (users and their PCs) that are connected to a LAN and are a part of a Microsoft domain. User account maintenance, user profiles, logon scripts and the ever-powerful group policy are covered. Students will also learn in the classroom what goes on behind the scenes with DHCP (Dynamic Host Control Protocol—automatic addressing) and DNS (Domain Name Server—computer name resolution). Ultimately they will take this classroom theory and apply it in the lab as they create their own active directory domains and configure DHCP and DNS services within their domain. This course can be used as preparation for Microsoft Certification though it is not an official exam preparation course. Prerequisite: CNSA 156

CNSA 166 (3 Credits) Internetworking Device and Concepts 
IP packet routing is how the Internet delivers information to computers attached to the Internet. IP packet routing is also how most organizations move data within their private enterprise network. Cisco routers are the industry-leading IP routers, and this course will provide the student with specific knowledge of the Cisco command line interface and Cisco IOS (Internetwork Operating System).
 Voice over IP (VoIP) is a significant technology that businesses are implementing in order to reduce cost and better leverage investments in the data network. For that reason, students in this course are provided with an overview of VoIP operation and then each student is assigned a lab project to configure a software PBX (Private Branch Exchange telephone switch) capable of routing phone calls within the lab environment. It is in this course that students will learn how to configure Cisco routers to perform IP routing and IP security. Routing protocols—the languages that routers use to speak to each other—are covered in detail and include RIP, RIP2, IGRP, EIGRP and OSPF. Security through the use of standard and extended access lists is covered. Also included in this course is detail on how to connect unregistered IP subnets to the Internet using Network and Port Address translation. This course can be used as preparation for industry certification exams COMPTIA Network+ and Cisco’s CCNA exam though it is not an official exam preparation course. Prerequisite: CNSA 161

CNSA 172 (3 Credits) Web Technologies and Network Security Fundamentals
The Internet is a global IP network. The World Wide The Internet is a global IP network. The World Wide Web is a collection of Web servers that are attached to the Internet. The Web servers serve HTML pages via the Internet to Web browsers like Internet Explorer and Netscape. In this course, students learn how to configure a Microsoft server to become a Web server. They learn how to write HTML-coded pages that they can place on their Web server and will progress to use an advanced web development tool to create a complete Web site that is dedicated to the critically important topic of networking security. Since security has become an ever increasingly important issue in our times, some of the security measures that we commonly use on the Internet (but often don’t realize it) are also covered in this course. It is important that each student is provided with fundamental networking security knowledge in order to ensure that they can defend the network resources under their control. These security measures include an overview of threats and defense strategies, the Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), digital certificates, hash codes, and digital signatures. Prerequisite: CNSA 166

CNSA 212 (3 Credits) Programming I
An introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming.  Students will learn a structured approach to problem solving and automating routine processes using modern programming languages.  The programming concepts used will emphasize logical thinking and current programming standards and conventions.  Students will also be introduced to object-oriented program development.  An overview of object-oriented analysis and design techniques and terminology is presented.  Students will learn to plan, design, compile, debug, and document applications in a visual programming environment using a programming language that is compatible with the Microsoft .NET Framework.  In addition, the course will introduce the integration of programming applications with databases that will likely be encountered in the workplace, as well as next generation programming environments.  Prerequisites: CNSA 156 and CNSA 161

CNSA 216 (3 Credits) Web Programming
A course that builds upon the information learned in The Internet (CNSA 171) course in the second semester of the CNSA Program’s first year, plus the Script Programming (CNSA 211) and Database Systems (CNSA 221) courses in the first semester of the second year.  Advanced Web programming and development techniques and tools are introduced.  The primary focus of the course is on the design of dynamic, interactive Web sites, using current Web programming languages and tools, including the technology of the Microsoft .NET Framework. Students will integrate the use of relational databases to provide data storage and retrieval for their interactive Web sites.  Students will also configure and manage Web servers to support interactive Web pages.  Students will use real-world examples, interactive lab exercises, and hands-on projects to reinforce key concepts. 
Prerequisites: CNSA 172, CNSA 212, CNSA 2222

CNSA 222 (3 Credits) Database Management Systems
An in-depth, hands-on survey course in which students will develop the skills and the expertise required to design, implement, and manage databases using a relational database management system (RDBMS).  Students will learn concepts of the relational database model, the principles of database design and normalization, and database administration.  
 In addition, the basic commands and functions of Structured Query Language (SQL) will be used
for data manipulation and extraction, as well as for database administration.  Finally, topics will
be introduced that relate enterprise databases to client/server systems, application programming,
Web database development, and E-Commerce.  Enterprise database products from Microsoft or a competitor will be used for course projects and assignments. Prerequisite: CNSA Sophomore standing

CNSA 227 (3 Credits) Management Information Systems
A course that introduces students to the policies and procedures required to administer an enterprise computer network, and to support an effective information technology department and users in the enterprise. Students will learn how to prepare and maintain documentation for information technology systems, software, processes, and projects. In addition, students will learn techniques for troubleshooting hardware, software, and network problems, and to develop effective resources to diagnose and resolve similar issues in the future. Students will be required to maintain daily system database, project, and security logs typical of those used in network management and application development environments. The skills learned in this course will be integrated into the other CNSA courses throughout the sophomore year.  An important component of the course will be research, readings, and discussion related to ethical practices in the field of information technology.  Prerequisite: CNSA Sophomore standing 

CNSA 256 (3 Credits) Operating Systems II
The second operating systems course in the CNSA curriculum that introduces students to the design, functionality, and administration of the predominant non-Windows operating system in the computer industry at the time of the course offering.  At this particular time, the course will present an in-depth examination of Linux, focusing on the proper installation and administration of the operating system.   Students will explore the wealth of support sites available to administrators of Linux systems, as well as the availability of productivity software applications and system administration tools for Linux systems.  Students will act as Linux system administrators and will examine the features of the Linux operating system that have increased its popularity.  A practical hands-on approach will be used.  Prerequisite: CNSA 156

CNSA 266 (3 Credits) Systems Administration II
The second systems administration course in the CNSA curriculum prepares students to manage and perform administrative tasks for network servers that are configured with the predominant non-Windows operating system in the computer industry at the time of the course offering.  At this particular time, the course will continue with an in-depth examination of the Linux operating system that began in CNSA 256 (Operating Systems II), focusing on advanced system maintenance and administration functions that are required of Linux system managers in an enterprise environment.  Students will explore topics that include system initialization, configuration of the X Windows system, the management of Linux system processes, Linux system administration tasks, and troubleshooting and performance.  The integration of Linux systems into a hybrid network enterprise will also be included.  Students will manage their own Linux servers in a practical hands-on approach to learning.
Prerequisite: CNSA 256

CNSA 271 (3 Credits) Network  Design
TThis is the first of two capstone courses in the CNSA curriculum (the second is CNSA 276, Practical Applications) that will require students to rely heavily upon the knowledge and skills acquired from their entire previous course experiences. Students will assume the role of true enterprise architects to design and implement a “live” network.  Students will work in project management teams, each of which will create and manage a Windows Active Directory domain that will include a domain controller and DNS server.  The project teams will manage all accounts (i.e., user, group, computer, security) in their respective domains, and will integrate non-Windows servers into the enterprise.  Finally, the project teams will prepare the domain for the implementation of an enterprise messaging (e-mail) system in the CNSA 276 course.  In designing their enterprise domains, the teams will conduct appropriate research, analyze and evaluate enterprise requirements and specifications, and document the network design. Prerequisite:  CNSA 266

 In addition, students should have the following knowledge and skills prior to starting the course. This knowledge and these skills should have been acquired in previous courses in the CNSA curriculum; however, in some cases it may be necessary for a student to acquire this knowledge and these skills through additional study during the course.
 • Knowledge of the fundamentals of networking technology.
 • Experience supporting a network or successful completion of a networking essentials course.

CNSA 276 (3 Credits) Practical Applications
The second of two capstone courses in the CNSA curriculum (the first is CNSA 271, Network Design) that will require students to rely heavily upon the knowledge and skills acquired from their entire previous CNSA course experiences.  Students will continue the role of enterprise architects working in self-directed project teams, to complete the process started in CNSA 271 of designing a “live” integrated network with various client and server operating systems.  This course will also include in-depth research and examination of selected network applications, and the implementation of those applications in the enterprise. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and administer the specified application(s), implement the application(s), document the installation(s), and train the appropriate users to use and administer the application(s).  Students will also learn to install, configure, and manage a current messaging system (i.e., e-mail server), and integrate that application into the enterprise.  Special attention is given to security issues associated with enterprise applications.  Prerequisites: CNSA 266, CNSA 271

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CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICIAN (COEL)
COEL 106  (5 credits) AC-DC Fundamentals 
This course presents basic principles, laws and formulas which relate to alternating (AC) direct current (DC) circuit applications in electricity. Topics will include: electron theory, Obnfs Law, series, parallel and combination circuit theory. In addition, capacitive and inductive reactive circuitry (RE, RC, RLC) will be discussed.

COEL 111  (5 credits) Residential Wiring 
This course is an introduction to residential wiring practices and techniques. Topics will cover basic residential symbols, blueprint reading, wire diagramming and use of applicable National Electrical Codes (NEC). Lab work and projects will enable students to develop, an understanding of basic residential circuits.

COEL 116  (2 credits) ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 
This course will present Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) general safety requirements for specific electrical and construction environments. Topics will include: Ladders, scaffolds, lockout and tagging, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), temporary wiring, harness techniques and confined spaces.

COEL 156 (5 credits) Commercial and Industrial Wiring 
Basic theory and laboratory assignments in safety, wiring practices, blueprint reading and NEC as it applies to commercial and industrial wiring techniques. Labs will enable students to gain practical experience installing and troubleshooting single and three-phase: distribution, transformers, motors and motor control circuits. Prerequisite: ELCON 102

COEL 161 (3 credits) NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE 
This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the National Electrical Code (NEC). Topics will include: foundational provisions, one family dwellings, multifamily dwellings, commercial locations, special occupancies, areas and equipment.

COEL 167 (3 credits) BLUEPRINT READING : ELECTRICAL 
This course is an introduction to basic blueprint reading skills and techniques. Topics will cover lines and symbols, pictorial and orthographic diagrams, specifications, scales, prints and plans. Class work will enable students, to develop a basic understanding of construction drawings.

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ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY (ELEC)
ELEC 106  (2 credits) Direct Current (DC) Fundamentals Laboratory 
Direct Current (DC) Fundamentals Laboratory Lab assignments enable students to demonstrate the theoretical topics covered in DC fundamentals. Proper connecting of electrical circuits and utilizing appropriate meters and instruments to take specific measurements. ELEC 106 will be taken in conjunction with ELEC 111

ELEC 107  (1 credits) ELECTRICITY I: THEORY AND ANALYSIS LAB 
Laboratory assignments will enable the student to demonstrate the theoretical topics covered in ELEC 113 Electricity I: Theory and Analysis.  Lab sessions will train the student to properly connect electrical circuitry and utilize appropriate metering instruments to take specific measurements to determine voltage, resistance, current, and power, and to troubleshoot various circuit layouts. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 113.

ELEC 111  (5 credits) Direct Current (DC) Fundamentals 
Presents basic principles, laws, and formulas that relate to direct current applications in electricity. Topics include electron theory, magnetism, Ohm’s law, power law, series, parallel, and series parallel circuit theory. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 106.

ELEC 113  (4 credits) ELECTRICITY I: THEORY AND ANALYSIS 
This course presents principles, laws, and formulas relating to basic direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) applications in electricity.  Topics include electron theory, magnetism, DC power supplies, Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s Laws, AC waveform analysis and basic motor design.  Resistive and inductive loads and various electrical circuit layouts are analyzed.  Taken in conjunction with ELEC 107.

ELEC 116 (5 credits) Residential Wiring I 
Introduction to residential wiring practices and techniques. Topics covered include basic residential symbols, blueprint reading, wire diagramming, and use of applicable National Electrical Code (NEC). Lab work develops an understanding of residential lighting and receptacle circuits.

ELEC 117 (4 credits) ELECTRICITY I: PRACTICUM 
Work shop projects will enable the student to develop an understanding of fundamental residential and preliminary commercial circuit design and installations, in accordance with the National Electrical Code (NEC) and associated building regulations. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 120. 

ELEC 120 (3 credits) ELECTRICITY I: SYSTEMS DESIGN 
This course is an introduction to fundamental residential and preliminary commercial wiring systems design.  Topics include: electrical and on-the-job safety, tool and material familiarization, plan design and specifications, wire diagramming, and the use of applicable National Electrical Code (NEC) standards. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 117. 

ELEC 126 (3 credits) ELECTRICITY II: SYSTEMS DESIGN 
This course is an advanced study in commercial and industrial electrical systems design and installation.  Sizing various raceway systems for commercial and industrial applications, custom electrical enclosure sizing, poly-phase distribution systems, and electrical materials familiarization are reviewed in detail.  Industrial process and motors control material, circuit planning and design, and AC motors sizing and wiring methods introduce the student to advanced electrical control systems. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 168. Prerequisite: Minimum 70% average in completed courses ELEC 117 & 120, or Instructor approval.

ELEC 156 (2 credits) Alternating Current (AC) Fundamentals Lab 
Lab assignments enable students to analyze the AC wave form and AC circuit characteristics by connecting appropriate electrical components and utilizing test instruments to take specific measurements. ELEC 156 will be taken in conjunction with ELEC 161. Prerequisite: ELEC 106 and ELEC 111

ELEC 157 (1 credit) ELECTRICITY II: THEORY AND ANALYSIS LAB
Laboratory assignments will enable the student to analyze AC waveforms and AC circuit characteristics by connecting the appropriate electrical components and utilizing electrical measuring instruments to take specific measurements.  Computer software will be used to enable advanced circuit analysis and troubleshooting. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 162. Prerequisite: Minimum 70% average in completed courses ELEC 107 & 113, or Instructor approval.

ELEC 161  (5 credits) Alternating Current (AC) Fundamentals 
Presents fundamental approach to the behavior and principles of alternating current (AC) applications. Topicsinclude wave-form characteristics, electro-magnetism, inductive/capacitive reactance, and impedance. Also analyzing principle of AC generation and transmission. Taken in conjunction with ELEC 156; Prerequisite: ELEC 106 and ELEC 111

ELEC 162  (4 credits) ELECTRICITY II: THEORY AND ANALYSIS
This course presents and advanced study in the principles, laws, and formulas relating to alternating current (AC) applications in electricity.  Topics include AC waveform analysis, electromagnetism, power generation and distribution, vector diagrams, power factor and correction, single-phase and poly-phase systems, and motors.  ELEC 161 will be taken in conjunction with ELEC 156. Prerequisite: Minimum 70% average in completed courses ELEC 107 & 113, or Instructor approval.

ELEC 167  (5 credits) Commercial and Industrial Wiring 
Basic theory and laboratory assignments in safety, wiring practices, blueprint reading, and the National Electrical Code (NEC) as it applies to commercial and industrial wiring techniques. Labs will enable students to gain practical experience installing and troubleshooting single and 3-phase: distribution, transformers, motors, and motor-control circuits/ Prerequisite: ELEC 116

ELEC 168 (4 credits) ELECTRICITY II: PRACTICUM
This course is a hands-on approach to commercial and industrial electrical systems design and installation.  Assignments include schematic and ladder diagramming, commercial wiring and raceway systems installations, process control wiring, troubleshooting single phase and poly-phase distribution systems, motors, and motor control circuits.  Taken in conjunction with ELEC 126. Prerequisite: Minimum 70% average in completed courses ELEC 117 & 120, or Instructor approval.
 

ELEC 206  (4 credits) Industrial Electricity 
Theory is covered and then complemented by utilizing test benches to connect single transformers into 3-phase banks for wye and delta systems. Determining size and bend race-ways for industrial loads. Becoming familiar with various hazardous areas and their requirements. Prerequisite: ELEC 156 and ELEC 161

ELEC 211  (4 credits) Industrial Electronics 
Theory and practice in basic electronic components, single and polyphase rectifier circuits, including power supplies. Use of thyristors to control the average load current through machinery in industry by changing conducting time. Basics of operational amplifiers and analog and digital transducers are covered. Prerequisite: ELEC 156 and ELEC 161

ELEC 216 (4 credits) DC and AC Motors and Generators 
Theory is covered. Complemented by utilizing a Lab-Volt dissectable machine trainer and electric motors, providing hands-on experience in disassembly, reassembly, and testing of DC, single phase, and three-phase AC motors. Prerequisite: ELEC 206

ELEC 256  (4 credits) Industrial Motor Control I 
Theory, design, and construction of the most standard motor control devices. Involves troubleshooting tasks to remove circuit faults. Prerequisite: ELEC 216

ELEC 261  (4 credits) Industrial Motor Control II 
Expands introductory motor control concepts learned in ELEC 256. Reversing, reduced voltage, and accelerating and decelerating methods and maintenance of motors. Prerequisite: ELEC 256

ELEC 266 (4 credits) Programmable Logic Controls & Drive Controls 
Utilizing the computer lab with the latest programming software, basic knowledge of commands and procedures are obtained to operate automated controls. Motor control boards are interfaced to the programmable control. Students become familiar with SCR and AC Drive control and how to troubleshoot them. Prerequisite: ELEC 211

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ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY (ETRN)
ETRN 107  (3 credits) DC Circuit Theory 
Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s laws, Thevenin, Norton, and Superposition theorems are used to analyze resistive circuits.  Components studied include: resistors, potentiometers, bridge circuits, comparators, simple timing circuits, switches, circuit breakers, relays, h-bridges, solenoids, photo-resistors, thermistors, current sources, and R/2R ladders. Corequisite: ETRN 111

ETRN 111  (3 credits) DC Laboratory 
Application of DC circuit theory.  Students build simple DC circuits based on concepts and components being studied.  Electrical measurements are performed to verify proper circuit operation.  Circuit construction, measuring techniques, soldering techniques, and safety practices are taught.  Students become proficient in the use of Digital Multi-meters and DC Power Supplies as test equipment. Corequisite: ETRN 107

ETRN 117  (3 credits) AC Circuit Theory 
Waveforms, capacitors, inductors, and transformers are studied.  Reactance, impedance, and phase angles are calculated.  Other concepts and components include:  Pulse Width Modulation, Time Constants, Microphones, Speakers, Passive Filters, Power Factor, 3-Phase, a basic overview of electrical service and wiring, and a basic overview of the power grid. Corequisite: ETRN 121; Prerequisites: ETRN 107, ETRN 111

ETRN 121  (3 credits) AC Laboratory 
Application of AC circuit theory.  Students build simple AC circuits based on concepts and components being studied.  Wave parameters, capacitance, inductance, impedance, phase angles and other quantities are measured to verify proper circuit operation.  Students become proficient in the use of Signal Generators and Oscilloscopes as test equipment.  Excel is used for passive filter design and analysis. Corequisite: ETRN 117; Prerequisites: ETRN 107, ETRN 111

ETRN 156  (3 credits) Solid State Devices I 
Diodes, Rectifiers, Power Supplies, Regulators, Clippers, Clampers, Multipliers, Specialty Diodes, BJT Transistors, and Transistor Amplifiers are studied. Corequisite: ETRN 161; Prerequisites: ETRN 117, ETRN 121

ETRN 161  (3 credits) Solid State Devices Laboratory I  
Students build and test diode circuits, power supplies, switching circuits, and amplifiers. Corequisite: ETRN 156; Prerequisite: ETRN 117 & 121

ETRN 166 (3 credits) Solid State Devices II 
FET transistors, Op Amps, Thyristors, Opto-isolators, and Solid State Relays are studied individually and within systems. Prerequisite: ETRN 156 & ETRN 161; Corequisite: ETRN 171 

ETRN 171  (3 credits) Solid State Devices Laboratory II  
Drivers, Buffers, Pre-amps, Amplifiers, Active Filters, Mixers, Oscillators, Output Interfaces, and Phase Controllers are built and tested.  Students design and build their own RGB LED controller with manual and audio control capability. Prerequisite: ETRN 156 & ETRN 161; Corequisite: ETRN 166

ETRN 207  (4 credits) Combinational Digital Logic with Lab
Basic digital electronic concepts are covered including introduction to digital machines, number systems (binary, octal, and hexadecimal), binary arithmetic, digital signals and switching, Boolean algebra, logic gates (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, XOR, XNOR), logic gate specifications, and basic combinational logic circuits.  Includes an introduction to and programming of Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs). Prerequisite: ETRN 107 & ETRN 111

ETRN 212  (4 credits) Sequential Digital Logic with Lab  
Comprehensive coverage of combinational and sequential logic circuits including adders, subtractors, flip-flops, shift registers, counters, digital multiplexors/demultiplexors, and A/D and D/A conversions. Prerequisite: ETRN 207

ETRN 217 (4 credits) Microprocessors/Microcontrollers with Lab 
This course is an introduction to the basic architecture and instruction sets of microprocessors and microcontrollers.   Learning activities will include basic assembly language programming, working with programming IDE environment, software simulation tools, hardware emulation tools, and logic analysis of hardware signals.  Currently both Harvard architecture (Microchip PIC microcontrollers) and von Neumann architecture (Motorola microprocessors) devices are covered. Prerequisite: ETRN 212

ETRN 221 (3 credits) Interfacing and Programming Microprocessors with Lab 
This course involves the interfacing of basic input and output devices at the chip level to microprocessors and microcontrollers and also includes their support ICs and common peripheral devices. Learning activities will include interfacing, programming (at assembly language level) and modifying existing assembly and C language code.  Test equipment including DSOs, DVMs, logic analyzers, and data analyzers will be used in support of these activities. Prerequisite: ETRN 217

ETRN 226   (1 credit) Troubleshooting Techniques
This course will provide a framework for solving problems.  It will identify and sharpen the skills required in troubleshooting.  The learning activities will consist of reading, discussion, and building troubleshooting models as they apply to troubleshooting electronic equipment and systems.  Actual troubleshooting experiences will be in the context of IBM PC compatibles. Prerequisites: ETRN 156,161,166,171

ETRN 257 (3 credits) Automation & Control Systems with PLCs/Lab 
This course handles digital electronic topics from an industrial viewpoint.  It deals with actual control systems utilizing microprocessors/microcontrollers and programmable logic controllers (PLCs) as well as ladder logic programming and circuits. This course is an introduction to process control, industrial process techniques, and instrumentation.  The processes in the industrial environment will be defined and classified.  The process controller and control modes (On-Off/P/PI/PID) will be introduced and explained at the technician level.  Process control methods such as open-loop, closed-loop, on-off control, continuous control, and control tuning will also be covered.  During this course the PLC will be used as the control device where possible and therefore PLC knowledge will be advanced in both interfacing and programming areas. Prerequisite: ETRN 117, 121, 156, 161, 166, 171

ETRN 266  (3 credits) Transducers and Control Systems with Lab 
This is a theory and laboratory course dealing with transducer devices used to convert all types of stimuli to electronic pulses. These include mechanical, pneumatic, and photoelectric devices and the control and measurement of their use in circuits.  Most activities will use the PLC as the control element and therefore advance ladder programming skills and introduce higher-level language programming of the PLC.  The main hardware/software used will be Allen Bradley MicroLogix and CompactLogix PLCs with RSLogix500 and RSLogix5000 programming software.  The IEC-61131 programming standard is used for high-level languages and templates for basic function in function block (FB), structured text (ST), instruction list (IL), and sequential function chart (SFC) programs are introduced. Prerequisite: ETRN 257

ETRN 271  (3 credits) Industrial Telecommunications and Motion Control with Lab 
This is an introductory course in the theory and simple applications of telemetry and telecommunications as it applies to industrial networks used for control system intercommunications (including RS232, TCP/IP, DH+, Modbus, DeviceNet, ASi, and various other industrial networks).   Coverage of AC, DC, servo, and stepper motor operation and control provide an introduction for motor and motion controller topics.  Motor and motion control systems are put into practical use and discussed as part of robotic systems. Prerequisite: ETRN 266

ETRN 276  (1 credit) Introduction to Visual Programming with Lab 
This course will provide an introduction to visual programming language concepts by using the LabVIEW and/or SoftWire programming languages.  The student will gain insight into the concepts involved in designing programs in a visual environment and also learn about data acquisition systems.  Topics covered and assignments will be related to the data acquisition environment on PC-based computers. The course will be a mixture of theory-based concepts, programming assignments, and device interfacing. Prerequisites: ETRN 207, 212, 217

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GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS AND PRINTING TECHNOLOGY (GRPH)
GRPH 106  (1 credit) Orientation to Graphic Communications 
Covers the history, development, safety, and commercial applications of printing processes. Students will learn about the curriculum and the industry including its processes, products, and careers. Emphasis will be placed on the attributes which are most desirable for successful entry and advancement.

GRPH 111  (1 credit) Basic Computer Operations 
Provides an understanding of computer terminology, software concepts, and keyboarding skills. Students will learn proper procedures for startup and shutdown of the computer and related equipment. Upon completion students will understand both hardware and software operations related to printing and networking.

GRPH 112 (1 credit) Digital Photography
Covers basic digital camera use through practical application. The assignments will center around composition, lighting, and the use of digital photography within the Graphic Communication industry. Color theory and digital manipulation will allow students to integrate their digital photographs into page layout and graphic design concepts.

GRPH 116 (4 credits) Introduction to Desktop Publishing
 Introduction to the hardware and software used in desktop publishing. Topics include graphical user interface and current industry uses such as design, layout, typography, illustration, and imaging. The student receives hands-on training in the computer environment using current production software. Basic scanning techniques are demonstrated.

GRPH 121  (3 credits) Introduction to Graphic Design  
Develops the student’s awareness of design principles and the elements of design presentation. Topics include creation of various design elements such as logos, advertisements, posters, and publication design. Upon completion, students should be able to apply design principles and visual elements to projects.

GRPH 126  (3 credits) Printing Processes 
Covers the various printing processes including offset, screen, flexo, and gravure. Career opportunities, salary potential, and the role each process plays in the industry today are also discussed. Safety procedures and operations are identified. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the major characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of each process. Prerequisite:  GRPH 171 

GRPH 156 (3 credits) Multimedia and Web Page Design 
Introduces the fundamentals of design and production for presentations and the World Wide Web. Basics of Hypertext Markup Language, the use of authoring software, and making PDF documents for Internet downloads and multimedia basics will be covered. Prerequisite: GRPH 121

GRPH 161  (3 credits) Page Layout
Introduces the student to the most commonly used page layout programs such as PageMaker® and QuarkXPress®. Hands-on activities include the fundamentals of word processing, graphics, and page assembly. Prerequisite:  GRPH 116

GRPH 166   (3 credits) Electronic Illustration
Use of illustration software to create images for print production. The use of desktop color scanning and digital photography will also be explored. Prerequisite:  GRPH 126

GRPH 171  (2 credits) Introduction to the Printing Process
Operation of small offset presses. The study of safety, feeders, register systems, deliveries, dampening units, inking systems, and the introduction to film assembly will be covered. Other printing processes will be explored. Prerequisite: GRPH 126

GRPH 176  (1 credit) Preflighting 
Covers information and skills needed to quickly, accurately, and effectively determine if all job components required for output are met before a project enters the production work flow. Covers font issues and page geometry using preflighting software.

 

3rd

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:
Third Semester

COURSE: GRPH 206 BINDERY AND FINISHING APPLICATIONS
COURSE: GRPH 212 GRAPHIC DESIGN & LAYOUT FOR PRINT PRODUCTION
Major topics include: Creating digital images and page layouts that are ready for print production.
1. How to create page layouts using parameters within InDesign. The student will understand the functions of the  four basic software packages, Page Layout, Word composition, Photo manipulation and graphic illustration. Upon completion of the course the student will have an understanding of the following; the terminology and tools used in a page layout software program, how to combine various digital formats into one production package, understand the importance of producing a layout in a timely manor, understand the costs and delays involved when a product is not created properly and understand page sequencing for a given quantity of pages and folding sequence (pagination).

PREREQUISITE: GRPH 116, 121, 161


COURSE: GRPH 217 PRINTING PROCESSES
Operation and practical experience in the use of small lithographic duplicator printing presses, Screen printing techniques, Pad printing and Digital output. Students will experience set-up, register, and production work in a variety of printing processes. Advance experience on close register two color press operation using electronic controls.
PREREQUISITE: GRPH 126, GRPH 171 and GRPH176

COURSE: GRPH 221 WORKPLACE EXPERIENCE
Students will experience first hand the production stages in a large commercial printing facility. Each student will have the opportunity to observe the management, planning, organization, plant layout production and scheduling that is needed to produce a quality printed product.

COURSE: GRPH 226 INK & PRINTING SUBSTRATES
Study of the manufacture, type and requirements of printing ink, includes ink mixing, and testing. Covers papermaking, classification of paper by kind, size, and weight also discussed are other surfaces that ink is applied to.


 

GRPH 206 (3 credits) Bindery and Finishing Applications
Covers the operation of parallel and right angle folders, programming cutter operation, drilling, stitching and padding. Proper use of paper handling equipment will also be discussed as well as safety in the bindery. The Student will understand the terminology and hardware used in the finishing and bindery process, the proper procedures to operate equipment found in the bindery, finishing operations that are often completed in the bindery and understand the relationship between design and finished product.

GRPH 212  (3 credits) Graphic Design and Layout for Print Production
Major topics include: Creating digital images and page layouts that are ready for print production.
How to create page layouts using parameters within InDesign. The student will understand the functions of the  four basic software packages, Page Layout, Word composition, Photo manipulation and graphic illustration. Upon completion of the course the student will have an understanding of the following; the terminology and tools used in a page layout software program, how to combine various digital formats into one production package, understand the importance of producing a layout in a timely manor, understand the costs and delays involved when a product is not created properly and understand page sequencing for a given quantity of pages and folding sequence (pagination).
Prerequisites: GRPH 116, 121, 161

GRPH 217   (3 credits) Printing Processes
Operation and practical experience in the use of small lithographic duplicator printing presses, Screen printing techniques, Pad printing and Digital output. Students will experience set-up, register, and production work in a variety of printing processes. Advance experience on close register two color press operation using electronic controls. Prerequisites: GRPH 126, GRPH 171 and GRPH 176

GRPH 221  (1 credit) Workplace Experience 
Students will experience first hand the production stages in a large commercial printing facility. Each student will have the opportunity to observe the management, planning, organization, plant layout production and scheduling that is needed to produce a quality printed product.

GRPH 226  (1 credit) Ink and Printing Substrates
Study of the manufacture, type, and requirements of printing ink, includes ink mixing and testing. Covers papermaking, classification of paper by kind, size, and weight is also discussed, as are other surfaces to which ink is applied.

GRPH 256  (3 credits) Advanced Offset Press Operation 
Practical experience on large sheet-fed offset equipment including adjustments, set up, makeready and imposition for single and multi-color production. Intensified study of the feeder, registration, printing, and delivery systems: ink, dampening problems, and quality control. Students will gain experience producing live jobs. Prerequisite: GRPH 216

GRPH 261  (3 credits) Advanced Image Assembly 
Practical skill development to assemble four-color process film including digital film output for four-color process printing. Students will learn proofing techniques, the preparation of folding dummies, and the imposition of film. Prerequisite: GRPH 211

GRPH 266   (3 credits) Process Color Theory
Color theory, color separation techniques, color proofing, and color printing are all discussed. Prerequisite: GRPH 166

GRPH 271  (1 credit) Printing Press Troubleshooting  
Students will develop large press troubleshooting skills utilizing the SHOTS training simulator.

GRPH 276  (3 credits) Printing Management and Production 
Provides students with the opportunity to study and produce a final project of their choice. Minimum requirements will be established that all students must meet. A written plan for the project is developed with the faculty member. Each student must do his or her own research, design, development production, and finishing. Students will schedule meetings with the faculty member for periodic progress review. Lectures will provide a study of the materials, supplies, estimating and production concerns found in the printing industry. Live jobs will be a part of the learning experience. Prerequisites: GRPH 106, GRPH 116, GRPH 121, GRPH 161, GRPH 166, GRPH 206, GRPH 226

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HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION (HVAC/R)
HVAC 122 (1.5 credits) OSHA Electrical and Construction Safety 
This course is designed to meet the requirements that all service technicians must have for training in the rules and regulations of OSHA Construction Safety and Building Maintenance Electrical Safety. Emphasis will be on the requirements for compliance, identifying a proper Lock-Out Tag-Out policy, and procedures a technician should follow for safe electrical work. 

HVAC 126 (1 credit) Electrical Fundamentals for HVAC/R  
This course is designed to provide the basic knowledge of electrical theory as it pertains to the HVAC/R industry. The course will emphasize the basic electrical laws and definitions, generation and distribution of electrical power, function of controls and loads, and electrical measurements and testing. 

HVAC 130 (1 credit) Electrical Components for HVAC/R 
This course exposes the student to common HVAC/R system motors and controls. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of electrical theory as it pertains to the application, and operation of motors, relays, thermostats, pressure switches, and other basic controls. 

HVAC 134 (1 credit) Electrical Circuits for HVAC/R  
This course will teach commonly used electrical circuits of the HVAC/R industry as a foundation for a technician to install, troubleshoot, and service equipment. The emphasis will be on drawing wiring diagrams, using schematics to install and wire basic electrical components, and the use of schematics for testing and troubleshooting electrical circuits.

HVAC 138 (2 credits) Lab Practice I: Electrical Applications
Practical Experience is provided to apply the theory learned concerning electrical components and controls of the HVAC/R industry. Students will demonstrate the proper electrical installations for basic A/C and heating equipment. Emphasis is placed on the installation, testing and start-up operation of motor, relays, thermostats, pressure switches and other basic controls.

HVAC 142 (1.5 credits) Installation Procedures 
This course introduces the basic methods, tools and materials needed for the installation of the HVAC/R equipment to the student. A foundational study of the purpose of various tools and skills necessary for their safe use will be emphasized. Materials and joining methods of various piping, tubing, wiring, and ductwork systems as used in this industry will be studied.

HVAC 146 (2 credits) Lab Practice II: Installation Applications 
This course provides the practical hands-on skill training. Piping practice utilizes various refrigeration trainers and a selection of commonly used A/C and heating equipment. Residential duct systems will be installed on working systems. Practice will be provided for the development of skills needed for various methods of joining copper tubing, stainless steel natural-gas tubing, plastic and iron pipe.

HVAC 150 (3 credits) Principles of Refrigeration 
This course provides a study of the basic principles of thermodynamics as applied to the refrigeration cycle. The Mollier Diagram will be used to display the purpose and operation of the various components used in the system at expected standard operating conditions. The lab portion will provide practice in measuring various system performances.

HVAC 155 (2 credits) Residential Heating Systems 
This course provides a basic understanding of different types of oil and natural gas residential heating systems. Emphasis will be on proper installation, sequence of operation, and proper maintenance requirements.

HVAC 160 (2 credits) Lab Practice III: Heating Applications  
This lab time provides the hands-on training pertaining to Residential Heating Systems. Typical residential heating systems will be utilized in the lab experience to master the skills necessary for proper installation and service. Students will practice typical annual servicing, combustion analysis and efficiency testing of fossil fuel heating systems.

HVAC 165 (2 credits) Comfort Cooling Systems 
Introduction to residential and light commercial A/C system components.  This course details the following components of air conditioner and refrigeration systems: evaporators, condensers, metering devices, compressors and other safety and servicing system components.    Emphasis is placed on applying the knowledge gained in HVAC 150, along with manufacturer specifications, to determine proper installation and operating conditions of these cooling system components. 

HVAC 170 (2 credits) Lab Practice IV: A/C Applications 
This lab provides the hands-on training for skills necessary to properly install and start-up comfort cooling systems. Students will be required to install a split system and test it for proper operation under various conditions.

HVAC 175 (2 credits) Refrigeration Management 
This course is designed to give the student the knowledge to understand the laws on venting and handling of the various refrigerants covered in the Clean Air Act–Section 608. A requirement for this course is to take the EPA Technician Certification Exam provided by ARI. Lab practice is provided in refrigerant recovery, recycling, evacuation, and charging various “small appliances” and “high pressure appliances.”

HVAC 180 (1 credit) Mechanical Codes for HVAC/R  
This course will introduce the HVAC/R technician to the current BOCA building code. The emphasis will be to highlight the sections of this code that are relevant to the technician for proper HVAC/R equipment installation. A brief overview of other national and local building codes will also be provided.

HVAC 206 (4 credits) Air Conditioning Systems 
Air conditioning benefits, unitary cooling, unitary combination cooling and heating equipment, central station systems, service and problem analysis and absorption refrigeration system. Prerequisites: HVAC 150, HVAC 165

HVAC 211  (3 credits) Heat Pump Systems 
Basic principles, components, and application of heat pump systems.

HVAC 216 (3 credits) System Installation and Start Up  
Codes and standards, heating start-up, heating checkouts, heating operation, AC start-up, AC checkouts, AC operation, heat pump start-up, heat pump checkouts, heat pump operation.

HVAC 221 (3 credits) Commercial Refrigeration 
System applications, refrigerated storage and ice machines.

HVAC 256   (3 credits) Load Calculations
Refrigeration, psychometrics, heating load, and cooling load calculations.

HVAC 261 (3 credits) Controls of HVAC 
Controls, valves, regulators, sensing devices/fuel controls, residential control systems—heating/cooling, commercial and engineered control systems, and heat pump controls.

HVAC 266  (3 credits) Ventilation 
Air flow principles/duct design, mechanical and electronic filtration, and fans.

HVAC 271  (3 credits) System Servicing and Troubleshooting 
Refrigeration system problems, electrical troubleshooting, heating service/problem analysis, and heat pump service/problem analysis, and AC service/problem analysis.

HVAC 310 (3 credits) Principles of Industrial Refrigeration I 
Covers the basics of industrial ammonia refrigeration including: temperature/pressure relationship, thermo-dynamics, the refrigeration cycle, properties of refrigerants, compressor types, lubrication, evaporator types, condensers, high pressure receivers, and purgers. 

HVAC 320   (3 credits) Principles of Industrial Refrigeration II: Low Side Components
Covers the many different types of refrigeration systems from flooded, direct expansion and pumped systems to 2-stage and cascade systems. Prerequisite: Either HVAC 150 or HVAC 310

HVAC 330  (3 credits) Principles of Industrial Refrigeration III: High Side Components 
Covers the high pressure or high side components of a typical industrial refrigeration system. Compressor and condenser design, operational theory, control, maintenance, and application will be discussed, including their interrelation within the balance of a complete industrial refrigeration system. Prerequisite: Either HVAC 150 or HVAC 310

HVAC 340 (3 credits) Industrial Refrigeration Operations and Safety
This course will provide background and guidance for refrigeration plant managers, engineers, and operators who are charged with the important areas of day-to-day plant operation: record keeping, preventive maintenance, safety, and regulatory requirements. This study is also recommended for anyone interested in understanding today’s ammonia refrigeration requirements. Prerequisite: Either HVAC 150 or HVAC 310

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MACHINE TOOL AND COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING (MACH)
MACH 106 (3 credits) Blueprint Reading and Related Math   
Interpretation of industrial drawings, basic skills in sketching, and applied mathematics.

MACH 112 (3 credits) Cutting Tools and Measurement
Procedures and techniques required to perform skilled bench work and use of precision measuring instruments. Variety of drill press, bench grinding, and power sawing operations will be introduced and exercised. Prerequisite: MACH 106

MACH 118  (4 credits) Lathe and Vertical Milling Machining I 
This course will introduce the student to the lathe and vertical milling machine. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of related operations. Prerequisite: MACH 106

MACH 123 (2 credits) Surface Grinding and Abrasive Machining 
Procedures and techniques required to safely set up and operate surface grinding equipment. Prerequisite: MACH 106

MACH 158  (3 credits) Lathe and Vertical Milling Machine II   
Techniques and procedures taught in MACH 118 will be enhanced and reinforced. This course will introduce students to more advanced techniques and procedures used on the lathe and the vertical milling machine. Prerequisites: MACH 106, MACH 118

MACH 161 (2 credits) Metallurgy 
Covering the basic principles of metallurgy, this course clarifies many industrial processes. Students will gain an understanding of quenching, annealing, case hardening, tempering, and crystallization. 

MACH 167   (4 credits) Machine Skills Lab
This is a lab intensive course which provides students with extensive hands-on training. Assigned projects aid students in gaining critical experience contributing to a well-rounded machining education. Prerequisites: MACH 112, MACH 118, MACH 123, MACH 158

MACH 172  (2 credits) Computer Numerical Control (CNC) I  
Introducing students to basic CNC concepts, this course explains and exercises Cartesian coordinates, codes, positioning systems, tooling, and word address programming. Prerequisite: MACH 118

MACH 207 (2 credits) Safety and Cutting Tools 
This course provides an introduction to job opportunities and apprenticeships in the machining field. Shop safety and cutting tool machining operations such as machinability, chip formation, carbide tooling, and cutting fluids will be discussed. Prerequisite: MACH 167

MACH 212 (4 credits) Lathe and Vertical Milling Machine III   
This course provides advanced learning on the operation of the lathe and milling machines. Cutting speeds, feeds, and depth of cut for carbide tooling will be presented. Advanced threading, boring, use of attachments, such as steady and follower rests will be studied. Some milling operations presented will include: machining multiple parts, slots, common shapes, keyways, dovetails, and t-slots. Students will complete advanced project work on the lathe and mill during laboratory time. Prerequisite: MACH 158

MACH 222  (3 credits)
Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Machining (CAD/CAM) I 
This course introduces the use of MasterCAM® as a tool for defining part geometry and generating CNC machine code. Two axis and three axis applications will be demonstrated, along with the use of the CAD/CAM applications. The AutoCAD® system will be introduced as a drafting system to be linked with MasterCAM®.

MACH 227  (3 credits) Computer Numerical Control II  
This course expands upon introductory concepts learned in CNC I and provides for increased hands-on application of learned material. Some advanced programming techniques include circular interpolation, cutter, compensation, and subroutines. Students will learn how to inspect precision parts with the coordinate measuring machine and are required to complete specific laboratory work to gain confidence in working with the CNC machines. Prerequisite: MACH 172 

MACH 256 (1 credit) Geometric Tolerancing 
Fundamental instruction in geometric dimensioning and tolerancing concepts as interpreted by the American Standards Institute.

MACH 262 (3 credits) Surface Grinding and Abrasive Machining II 
Advanced operation of surface and tool and cutter grinders will be taught in this course. Form grinding, cutter sharpening, and the use of grinding attachments will be presented. Some operations presented will include: wheel dressing, wheel selection, non-magnetic work holding, cylindrical grinding, honing, and lapping. Students will be required to prove competency in grinding machine operation by completing assigned projects during laboratory time. Prerequisite: MACH 123

MACH 266  (2 credits) Electrical Discharge Machining and Joining of Metals 
Theoretical and practical application of electrical discharge machining. Students will learn how to make electrodes and machine with the EDM machine. Joining of metals with welding and brazing operations taught. Braze sample parts to test skills.

MACH 272 (3 credits) Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Machining (CAD/CAM) II
This course teaches intermediate-level use of MasterCAM® as a tool for defining part geometry for both lathe and milling. Two axis and three axis applications will be demonstrated along with the use of CAD/CAM applications. Three-dimensional surfacing and solids will be taught. Prerequisite: MACH 222

MACH 276 (3 credits) Computer Numerical Control III  
Provides students with additional time to perform specific advanced laboratory exercises in both programming and setup operations on the CNC equipment. Advanced concepts studied include: CAM applications, cavity milling, ramping, threading, and live tooling on the lathe. A manufacturing group project will be completed that utilizes CAM and CNC. Prerequisite:  MACH 227

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MASONRY CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY (MASN)
MASN 106  (5 credits) Introduction to Masonry Construction 
Includes the identification and safe use of various masonry tools and equipment with special emphasis on personal and job site safety. Students will start to build various masonry projects.

MASN 111 (3 credits) Brick Masonry Applications  
Stresses the importance of using proper masonry terminology. A variety of masonry procedures such as toothing, moisture control, and joint finishes will be covered. Also included are different bonds and patterns, different brick positions, and the function of mortar joints. Students work on various masonry projects.

MASN 116 (3 credits) Chimney Construction 
Emphasis on the proper construction of a masonry chimney. Proper terminology, workmanship, and various components of different size chimneys are stressed.   

MASN 121 (2 credits) Architectural Drafting I 
Residential construction and relation to construction drawings. Drafting skills in the making of residential construction drawings. Related trade options included.

MASN 156 (5 credits) Block Construction 
Offers a brief history of concrete block, the materials used in its production and manufacturing methods. Sizes and shapes of different concrete block and their many uses will be covered. Students learn terminology, the placement of anchor bolts and bearing plates, working around conduit and ductwork, and other related construction methods.

MASN 161 (3 credits) Masonry Materials and Their Applications 
Deals with the manufacture of brick, its characteristics and properties, and the function and ingredients of cement. Also covered will be the proper construction of expansion joints, different methods of tying masonry walls to one another, and the proper installation of wall coping and flashing.

MASN 166 (3 credits) Masonry Wall Systems 
Different types of walls and their functions explained. Also covered will be different ways of tying walls together, flashing, weep holes, grouting, reinforcement, and wall composition.

MASN 206 (5 credits) Residential Masonry Construction  
Application of skills relative to masonry systems for residential construction. Includes working on the off-campus housing project. Techniques include firewall construction; brick veneering; porch/patio and step construction; and proper preparation for varying weather conditions. 

MASN 211  (2 credits) Planning and Management 
Organizing personnel and materials on a job site. Planning and coordinating the placement of equipment and materials and completing a job on time and within budget. Supervisory duties and responsibilities covered. 

MASN 216 (4 credits) Blueprint Reading and Estimating  
Basic skills to interpret residential construction drawings. Emphasis on calculation of materials, labor, and equipment necessary to complete selected projects. Proposals and closed bids required.

MASN 256 (4 credits) Fireplace Construction 
Provides history, theory, and function of the fireplace. Students design and construct a fireplace of their choice with emphasis on proper terminology, workmanship, and various components of different fireplaces.

MASN 261 (3 credits) Arch Construction 
Skills necessary to build various types of arches. Terminology, different types, and various techniques used in the construction of arches.

MASN 266  (2 credits) Tile Setting 
Basics of ceramic tile setting. Emphasis placed on terminology, tools, safety, and proper layout.

MASN 271 (3 credits) Footings and Foundations 
Provides the opportunity to layout and construct a residential concrete block foundation. Topics include blueprint interpretation, materials estimating, installation of anchor bolts, partition construction, and the use of the transit for site layout.

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (MET)
MET 101  (3 credits) Drafting Fundamentals 
An introductory course in the basics of instrument drawing, lettering, geometric construction, and associated manual drafting techniques.

MET 106  (3 credits) Engineering Graphics 
A study of orthographic projection and the creation of engineering drawings with applications in sectioning and auxiliary views. This course also includes isometric drawing and practice in freehand sketching.

MET 111 (3 credits) Engineering Standards
A study of the ASME dimensioning guidelines including geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) for the design and manufacture of interchangeable mechanical parts.

MET 116 (3 credits) Computer-Aided Drafting  
An introduction to computer-aided drafting and its applications. The student will learn the fundamentals of using the computer operating system and the CAD programs. These skills are affirmed with the completion of a series of mechanical drawings.

MET 161 (3 credits)  Fabrication Principles 
A study of the industrial practices in the design and fabrication of sheet-metal components, welded assemblies, and piping systems. Prerequisite: MET 116 

MET 166  (3 credits) Mechanical Design 
A study of power transmission fundamentals and design-related computations. Design applications include sizing and/or selection of belts, chains, gears, bearings, couplings, shafts, cams, linkages, and electric motors.

MET 171  (3 credits) Product Design 
The practical implementation of the mechanical design practices, engineering standards, and computer-aided drafting techniques as they relate to the design and fabrication of a manufactured product. Prerequisites: MET 106, MET 116   

MET 176 (3 credits) Manufacturing Processes 
A comprehensive study of the processing of materials as it relates to manufacturing. In this course, class lectures and literature review will be combined with machine shop practice and plant visits to form a well-rounded understanding of the intricacies of manufacturing technology.

MET 201  (3 credits) Engineering Mechanics 
An introduction to the analysis of the static and dynamic forces which govern the behavior of structures and machines. The analytic skills in vector mechanics established in this course will be employed for the design of structural components and assemblies as well as machine elements such as cams, gears, and linkages. Prerequisites: MATH 131, MATH 141, PHYS 111; Corequisite: PHYS 116

MET 206  (3 credits) Fluid Mechanics 
A study of the effects of stationary and moving fluids as it relates to the analysis and design of mechanical systems. Topics involving the volume and energy transfer of a working fluid are utilized to demonstrate the problems commonly encountered in industry. Corequisite: MET 201

MET 211 (3 credits) Tool Design 
A study of the practices relating to the design of manufacturing tooling for locating, clamping, forming, and/or shaping of a given part. These concepts will be employed by the student during the completion of an independent tool design project. Prerequisite: MET 176

MET 216  (3 credits) Parametric Solid Modeling 
An intermediate computer-aided drafting course in three-dimensional, feature-based, parametric solid modeling with applications in the designing and detailing of mechanical components and assemblies.  Applications include utilization of the Pro/ENGINEER® program in the creation and modification of solid models for complex parts and assemblies, as well as their related engineering drawings and assemblies.  Prerequisite: MET 116  

MET 261  (3 credits) Engineering Materials 
An introduction to the selection and utilization of engineering materials as it relates to their mechanical characteristics under various operating conditions. Material strength and failure criteria will be utilized to identify design margins of safety for mechanical components. Prerequisites: MET 176, ENG 106, ENG 216, PHYS 111, PHYS 216

MET 266  (3 credits) Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer
An introduction to the principles which govern the control and transformation of energy. These principles provide a concise description of the processes that are common to boiler, refrigeration, and related systems. Prerequisites: MET 206, PHYS 116

MET 271  (3 credits) Machine Design 
A study of the design of machine elements such as gears, shafts, bearings, clutches, brakes, flywheels, and related assemblies. These concepts will be employed by the student during the completion of an independent machine design project. Prerequisites: MET 201, PHYS 116

MET 276  (3 credits) Engineering Seminar 
A review course for the fundamentals of manufacturing including engineering economics and special topics of engineering technology. This course also covers engineering internship projects, technical presentations, and preparation for the SME certification examination. Prerequisites: MET 211, MET 216; Corequisites: MET 261, MET 266, MET 271

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METALS FABRICATION AND WELDING TECHNOLOGY (MFWT)
MFWT 106  (3 credits) Gas Metal Arc Welding/Plasma Arc Cutting 
Provides a thorough technical understanding of welding safety, gas metal arc welding fundamentals, gas metal arc equipment adjustments, metal transfer, and shielding gases. Training to develop the manual skill necessary to make high quality gas metal arc welds in all positions on mild steel from 1/16” to 3/8” thickness with single and multiple passes, using short circuit transfer. 

MFWT 111 (3 credits) Metals Fabrication I: Introduction to Hand and Machine Processes 
Introduction to tools, materials, and equipment required to fabricate basic sheet metal projects. Students develop an understanding of seaming, hemming, and fastening techniques. Safety standards according to OSHA.

MFWT 121 (3 credits) HVAC Duct Design and Fabrication  
Teaches how to properly design and fabricated duct systems relative to low pressure HVAC systems. Machinery, seaming, connecting and basic layout techniques will be covered. Interpretation of applicable SMACNA codes for duct construction. Prerequisite: MFWT 111

MFWT 126 (3 credits) Drafting Fundamentals 
Introduction to drafting and sketching techniques. Major topics include geometric construction, drafting equipment and Orthographic projections. Mechanical drawing required.

MFWT 156 (2 credits) Oxy-Acetylene Welding, Cutting, and Brazing 
Offers a technical understanding of oxy-acetylene welding, flame cutting, brazing fundamentals, and welding safety. Training for manual skill necessary to produce high quality welds on mild steel in all positions. Manual and mechanized flame cutting and brazing mild steel also included. Prerequisite: MFWT 111

MFWT 161 (3 credits) Metals Fabrication II: Parallel Line Development and Machine Processes 
Instruction in the use of precision measuring tools and saws. Use of parallel line method of pattern development for fabrication of elbows, tees and offsets using sheet metal, pipe, and plate materials. Prerequisite: MFWT 111

MFWT 166 (3 credits) Industrial Applications I: Fabrication Blueprint Reading 
ment used in the various fabrication and welding trades. Sheet and plate products plus structures, tubing, pipe, and the various alloys of steel, aluminum and stainless steel. Included will be the application of metals for industrial, commercial, and manufacturing design. Prerequisite: MFWT 111

MFWT 171  (2 credits)Materials of Trade and Applied Metallurgy 
Common materials, designations, and methods of measurement used in the various fabrication and welding trades. Sheet and plate products plus structures, tubing, pipe, and the various alloys of steel, aluminum and stainless steel. 

MFWT 207  (4 credits) Shielded Metal Arc Welding  
Provides the student with a thorough technical understanding of Shielded Metal Arc Welding fundamentals, welding safety, welding machines, electrode classifications and selections. It also provides training to develop the manual skill necessary to produce high quality Shielded Metal Arc welds in all positions on mild steel from 16 gage to 1” plate with single and multiple passes. The welding process using mild steel electrodes with low hydrogen and iron powder flux coatings while using AC and DC power sources will be covered. Prerequisite: MFWT 156 

MFWT 212 (4 credits) Metals Fabrication III: Triangulation Pattern Devel and Advanced Machine Processes 
Designed to introduce students to the triangulation method of pattern development. Using this discipline of pattern development, the student will design, layout and fabricate transitions, Y-branches and other irregular fittings related to sheet metal, piping and miscellaneous plate fabrication according to job specifications. Students will also learn advanced machinery set-up techniques relative to the fabrication of components designed using this lay out process. Instruction in the use of precision measuring tools, iron workers, press brakes and saws will also be major topics covered. Prerequisites: MFWT 111, MFWT 161

MFWT 222 (4 credits) Industrial Applications II: CNC Applications and Estimating 
The major objective of this course is to introduce students to aspects of programming and utilizing Computer Controlled Plasma and Oxl-Fuel cutting systems. Students will use AutoCAD and MTC Pronest software packages to produce duct, weldment and miscellaneous profile parts from blueprints, sketches and field measurements. Programmed parts will then be nested and cut on given sheet or plate sizes using state of the art CNC systems plasma cutting system. Layout techniques previously learned for profile programming jobs will be utilized. Other topics covered in this course will be project management and estimating.  Prerequisite: MFWT 161, MFWT 161, CIS 105

MFWT 257  (4 credits) Gas Tungsten Arc Welding 
Provides the student with a thorough understanding of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding fundamentals, arc characteristics and welding safety. It provides training to develop the manual skill necessary to make high quality Gas Tungsten Arc welds in all positions on 16 and 11 gage mild steel, 16 and 11 gage aluminum, also 16 gage stainless steel using both alternating and direct current. In addition, material is presented on the weld characteristics of carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminum. The use of abrasives and other clean up techniques  to produce quality USDA and FDA finishes will be covered. Instruction on the use of purging will also be given.  Prerequisite: MFWT 206 

MFWT 262  (4 credits) Metals Fabrication IV: Radial Line   Development and Machine Processes
This course is designed to instruct the student in the use the radial line method of pattern development. The student will layout and fabricate various sheet metal and plate fittings such as cones, reducers and take – off branches using this technique. Fittings will then be  welded using processes previously learned. Prerequisite: MFWT 211

MFWT 267 (4 credits) Industrial Applications III:  Print Reading for Welding / Field Equipment and Rigging 
Selected on and off campus projects utilized to reinforce previous instruction. Opportunity to study and evaluate projects to learn various aspects of industry. Applicable codes and standards used to insure proper design and applications of materials and processes. Also included will be the interpretation of welding blue prints and applications in field equipment and rigging. Prerequisite: MFWT 166

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PLUMBING TECHNOLOGY (PLBG)
PLBG 106   (1 credit) The Plumbing Trade
Prepares students for their role in the Plumbing program at Stevens College and their future in the field. Examines organizational skills, safe work habits, and proper work attitude. Surveys the history of plumbing while also offering an examination of job opportunities and an analysis of steps in career progressions.

PLBG 111  (2 credits) Plumbing Design I: Introduction to Plumbing Systems
Study of potable water, methods of sewage disposal,components of plumbing systems, and basic physics as related to plumbing. Prerequisite: PLBG 200

PLBG 116  (7 credits) Plumbing Installation I: Plumbing Tools and Materials 
Familiarizes students with the proper selection and use of all the basic tools (hand tools, power tools, and torches) and materials (cast iron, steel, copper, plastics, and others) of the plumbing and pipefitting trades.

PLBG 121 (2 credits) Construction Blueprint Reading 
Introduces the student to construction prints and documents. Basic drawing symbols and line forms are explained, and the course covers the use of basic drawing tools, dimensioning, and single line pipe drawing methods and practices.

PLBG 156 (3 credits) Plumbing Design II: Blueprint Reading 
Focus on residential piping system design. Skills covered include the following: designing systems; reading blueprints; making orthographic and isometric pipe sketches and drawings; sizing potable water systems; sizing DWV systems; and sizing natural gas systems. Prerequisite: PLBG 111

PLBG 161 (5 credits) Plumbing Installation II: Residential Plumbing Installation 
Installation of residential piping systems, bathroom/kitchen fixtures, and water heaters. Prerequisites: PLBG 111, PLBG 116

PLBG 166 (2 credits) Plumbing Services I: Introduction to Plumbing Services 
Focuses on the selection and use of tools and procedures for servicing and repairing plumbing systems. Skills include: troubleshooting and repairing faucets and valves, leaking pipes, clogged drains, and toilets. Prerequisite: PLBG 161 

PLBG 206  (2 credits) Plumbing Design III: Plumbing Codes 
By examining the The 2006 International Plumbing Code, this course prepares the student to design, install, and maintain plumbing systems in compliance with this statewide code. The course features the proper use of materials and fittings, correct venting, methods for testing plumbing systems, and the sizing of potable water, drainage waste and vent, storm water drainage, and natural gas piping systems. Prerequisites: PLBG 156, PLBG 161

PLBG 211  (4 credits) Plumbing Installation III 
An advanced residential plumbing course that is basically concerned with the plumbing of the housing project. Shop practice is made available as needed, but most instruction occurs at the housing project. Prerequisite: PLBG 206

PLBG 216  (3 credits) Plumbing Installation IV: Commercial Plumbing Installation 
Covers the design and installation of compressed air piping systems, storm water drainage systems, specification fittings and fixtures, and commercial sanitary drainage and venting, and potable water systems. The student learns to read commercial blueprints, and to acquire information from specification literature. The student applies this information in developing the capstone project, a complete and functioning commercial toilet room facility. Prerequisite: PLBG 161

PLBG 221  (1 credit) Plumbing Service II: Advanced Plumbing Services 
An extension of PLBG 166. Tools and procedures to repair flushmeter valves, water heaters, frozen pipes, water hammer, and backflow. Prerequisite: PLBG 166

PLBG 256  (3 credits) Plumbing Design IV: Designing Hydronic Heating Systems 
Designing and sizing hydronic heating systems.Includes the calculation of heat loss.
Prerequisite: PLBG 156

PLBG 261 (4 credits) Plumbing Installation V: Installing Hydronic Heating Systems 
Installation of residential and commercial hot water heating systems. Prerequisite: PLBG 116

PLBG 266  (2 credits) Plumbing Service III: Servicing Hydronic Heating Systems
Heating service, including repair of hot water circulation problems, combustion testing, oil burner, and gas burner repair, boiler clean-up, and system troubleshooting. Prerequisite: PLBG 116

PLBG 271 (2 credits) Plumbing Installation VI 
Includes hands-on experience and training in the installation of plumbing fixtures, appliances, and the finish piping in a permanent structure. Work is done on the housing project and other appropriate projects around the campus. Prerequisite: PLBG 211

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RESPIRATORY CARE (RESP)
RESP 101 (4 credits) Introduction to Respiratory Care  
This course will introduce the student to the profession of Respiratory Care and its associated regulating agencies. Basic respiratory care modalities will be discussed, particularly as they relate to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Treatment modalities will include medical gas therapy, humidity therapy, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy and an introduction to bronchodilator therapy.

RESP 106 (4 credits) Intermediate Respiratory Care  
This course will provide the basic principles of bronchial hygiene therapy including related equipment. It will introduce the assessment and care of a patient with cystic fibrosis. Also included will be techniques of hyperinflation therapy and an introduction to upper airway management, including assessment of breath sounds, cough techniques and suctioning of the upper airway. It will also provide an introduction to arterial blood gas interpretation. Prerequisites: RESP 101, RESP 120

RESP 121 (4 credits) Clinical Application of Respiratory Care I 
This clinical experience will give the students the opportunity to put into practice the skills they have learned thus far which begin with chart review, patient interview, patient history, basic patient assessment and patient treatment with modes of care including oxygen therapy, humidity and aerosol therapy, bronchial hygiene and hyperinflation therapy. An introduction to arterial blood gas analysis and sampling will also be included. Prerequisites: RESP 101& 120; corequisite: RESP 102

RESP 200 (3 credits) Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology
This lecture/lab course addresses the anatomy and physiology of the pulmonary system and its relation to thoracic musculoskeletal system and the cardiovascular system. This course is designed to demonstrate the application of cardiopulmonary physiological principles in the practice of medical/respiratory care. It will summarize concepts related to acid-base balance, oxygenation and electrolyte interpretation. It will include an introduction to techniques in measurement of hemodynamic and pulmonary function. Prerequisites: BIO 250, RESP 102

RESP 203 (2 credits) Cardiopulmonary Pharmacology  
This course will discuss the principles of pharmacology; the pharmacology of the respiratory system; and the routes of delivery of respiratory drugs, including bronchodilators, anti-inflammatory agents, secretion modifiers, surfactant replacements and inhaled antimicrobials. It will also provide an introduction to systemic antimicrobial agents and basic cardiovascular medications. Prerequisite: RESP 102; corequisite: RESP 201

RESP 204 (2 credits) Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology   
The student will develop a working knowledge of pulmonary pathophysiology. Course topics will include disorders of neonatal, pediatric, adult and geriatric patients. For each cardiopulmonary disorder reviewed, the following will be included: related medical history, pathophysiology, physical findings, breath sounds, lab data including arterial blood gas results, pulmonary function test results, chest radiography, lung scans, MRIs of the thorax, cardiovascular findings, recommended treatment modalities and prognosis. Prerequisites: RESP 201, RESP 203; corequisite: RESP 206

RESP 205 (3 credits) Mechanical Ventilation and Critical Care I 
This beginning course in mechanical ventilation of the critically ill patient will include a comprehensive review of artificial airways, their insertion and management. It will also include an introduction to mechanical ventilation (invasive and noninvasive), indications for ventilation and initial settings based on the patient size (neonatal, pediatric and adult) and diagnosis. The course will give an overview of physical principles of mechanical ventilators and breath classification. Prerequisites: RESP 102, RESP 220; corequisites: RESP 204, RESP 206

RESP 206 (3 credits) Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics
The student will gain an understanding of the equipment and techniques for performing pulmonary function testing, thoracic radiographic techniques, hemodynamic and gas exchange monitoring, exercise testing and fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Additional newer diagnostic techniques will be reviewed. Prerequisites: RESP 102, RESP 202; corequisite: RESP 204  

RESP 207  (3 credits) Mechanical Ventilation and Critical Care II
This second course in mechanical ventilation will continue with management of the critically ill patient requiring ventilator support. The student will learn how to make appropriate ventilator changes based on patient assessment, pathophysiology and readiness to wean. Identifying complications of mechanical ventilation and identifying weaning criteria will also be discussed. Additional methods of ventilation (closed loop) and critical care monitoring techniques will be reviewed. Prerequisites: RESP 205, RESP 221; corequisite: RESP 222

RESP 210 (3 credits) Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Summative Concepts 
The advanced cardiac life support techniques will be taught to prepare students for emergency situations of cardiopulmonary collapse. The course will also provide a summary of previous program material and practice of clinical simulation problems to pull together key concepts students have learned in previous courses. Prerequisites: RESP 204, RESP 206

RESP 212 (2 credits) Problem Solving and Decision Making in Patient Management  
This course is an overall review of respiratory management of patients. Key points of emphasis will be the student’s ability to obtain appropriate clinical data, assessment information and establish the differential diagnosis of a patient. Based on the information obtained, appropriate respiratory modalities will be used for treatment. The patient’s response to therapy will be assessed and adjusted appropriately. Identifying and correcting equipment malfunctions will also be included. Respiratory care department quality improvement programs and application of respiratory care protocols will be reviewed. Prerequisites: RESP 210, RESP 222

RESP 213 (2 credits) Cardiovascular Monitoring and Assessment 
This course provides information on advanced techniques in cardiovascular monitoring and assessment. Emphasis will be placed on 12 lead EKG performance and interpretation, arterial catheter insertion, invasive arterial pressure monitoring, evaluation of hemodynamic data and the effects of mechanical ventilation on hemodynamic monitoring. Prerequisites: RESP 210, RESP 222

RESP 220 (4 credits) Clinical Application of Respiratory  Care II 
This clinical rotation will allow students the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into problem-solving where patient histories, diagnosis, test results, medications and treatments will be related to the respiratory care of the patient. The respiratory care techniques will include additional practice in those techniques previously used and time-management will be emphasized. The infrastructure of the critical care facility will also be researched. Prerequisites: RESP 102, RESP 121

RESP 221  (5 credits) Clinical Application of Respiratory Care III
An introduction into the intensive care unit will give students the opportunity to provide basic treatment techniques in an intensive care setting. As their understanding of mechanical ventilation evolves, students will be able to assess critically ill patients and assist in the management of patients receiving ventilatory support. This will include a variety of patient sizes (neonatal, pediatric, and adult) and the disorders leading to the patient’s critical episode. Prerequisites: RESP 203, RESP 220; corequisites: RESP 204, RESP 205, RESP 206

RESP 222 (5 credits) Clinical Application of Respiratory Care IV 
This clinical rotation will provide the needed opportunity for students to gain better patient- and time-management skills in the critical care unit of the hospital. Rotations will also be provided to facilities including pulmonary function laboratories, bronchoscopy suites, home care agencies, sleep study centers, cardiac/pulmonary rehabilitation programs and extended nursing facilities. Prerequisites: RESP 205, RESP 208, RESP 221; corequisite: RESP 207

RESP 223 (5 credits) Clinical Application of Respiratory Care V 
This clinical rotation student participation in three critical care unit of the hospital. Rotations will include neonatal intensive care unites (NICUs), pediatric units, adult ICUs for hemodynamic monitoring and additional mechanical ventilation opportunities and 12 lead EKG performance. Prerequisites: RESP 222 

RESP 270  (3 credits) Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care
This course encompasses the therapeutic approach to the assessment and appropriate respiratory management of the neonatal and pediatric patient. The unique characteristics of the cardiopulmonary systems from birth to childhood will be reviewed. Maternal and newborn evaluation will be covered. Mechanical ventilation techniques, settings, changes and discontinuation will be discussed. Advanced techniques of management such as high frequency ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are also included. Prerequisites: RESP 210, RESP 222

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SPECIAL COURSES
CSC 100–105
 (1–5 credits) Community Service  
The community service area will be determined by the student and the appropriate faculty member. On-site visits will be made where possible to determine progress.
TECH 100–105  (1–5 credits) Special Topics  
Special topics will be selected. The topic to be studied will be determined by the instructor and approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Credits earned will be applicable either as free electives in the program or as credits used for graduation (with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.)
TECH 100, 199, 200, 299  (1–8 credits) Internships  
Representing a possibility
of four semesters, internships are designed to provide credit for supervised on-the-job work experience directly related to a student’s major. Credit varies based upon the total hours worked. The credit-to-work hour ratio is 1 credit = 50 work hours. These courses include employer supervision and evaluation.
TECH 150  (1 credit)  
This course provides construction and industrial safety training using OSHA standards that apply to the programs of study at Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology.  The training received covers all topic areas required by the OSHA Outreach Training Program for industry recognized ten hour certifications in Construction and General Industry safety.

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GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)
CIS 105 (3 credits) Introduction to CAD
Provides an introduction to the use of computer software used to draw. Students will learn introductory AutoCAD® commands used to create basic geometric shapes and editing functions used to modify geometry. Measuring and
distance specifications for objects will be taught along with text creation for use in notes and specifications. Students will also learn to use image transfer software that will convert pictures and images into line geometry. (NOTE: ARCH and MET students may not take this course without consent of their respective program faculty members.)

CIS 111  (3 credits) Introduction to Computer Applications 
Introduction to applications for use in the professional and college environment. Students will obtain skills in the latest business software. Activities consist of hands-on exercises using the operating system, word processing, spreadsheet, database management and presentation programs.

CIS 206 (3 credits) Microsoft Word®
This course is comprehensive in that it covers everything from introductory material, creating a document in Word®, to the very complex, such as creating a Web page. There is a strong emphasis on using Internet information in creating documents. This is the complete Word® course and students will be prepared to take the MOUS exams at course completion. A background in Word® is helpful, but not required. 

CIS 211 (3 credits) Microsoft Excel®
This is the comprehensive course in Excel®. It contains everything from basic introductory material (a simple spreadsheet) to complex business formulas and mapping procedures. The student, upon completion, will be prepared to take the MOUS exam for Excel® certification. Students should have a fundamental understanding of spreadsheets to take this course.

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ENGLISH (ENG)
ENG 106 Composition I  (3 credits)
Develops fluency in writing. Creates interest in and respect for proper usage, sentence structure, and precise expression.

ENG 111 Writing for Publication (3 credits)
Explores various components of writing for publication including creative journalism, fictional writing, news gathering, interviewing, and editing as well as an analysis of modern theories and practices.

ENG 116 Short Story and Poetry  (3 credits)
Analysis of a variety of short stories and poems with an emphasis on developing interpretive skills. Special attention given to individual presentations and class discussion.

ENG 216 Technical Report Writing  (3 credits)
Presents technical subject matter with emphasis on intensive practice in the various methods of expository writing. Attention given to various technical forms, including instruction, proposal, progress, and feasibility reports. Prerequisite: ENG 106 or instructor permission

ENG 221 Public Speaking   (3 credits)
Modes of speech communication, including demonstration, information, persuasion, and interview.

ENG 230 Composition II   (3 credits)
Writing expository prose. Presents writing problems and advice on resolution. Different kinds of writing situations, including a research project. Prerequisite: ENG 106

ENG 240 Introduction to Drama and Analysis  (3 Credits)
Comprehensive view of dramatic literature of the American and foreign theater through the analysis of selected plays.

ENG 250 (3 credits) Introduction to Folklore
Techniques of collecting, analyzing, and preserving folklore. Covers folk art; folk architecture and material culture; folk beliefs; folk music and ballads; and folk narratives. Individual collecting projects
encouraged.

ENG 255 (3 credits) Short Contemporary Novel  
Essential components of fiction, including character, theme, plot, setting, narrative technique, symbolism, irony, style, and social significance.

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HISTORY (HIST)
HIST 106 American History I  (3 credits)
This course surveys American history from the colonial period to the Reconstruction period following the American Civil War. Students will understand the major events that have shaped American history; learn how American cultural values and character have developed as a result of these events; understand how myths and stereotypes about American history affect our perception of the past and present; and analyze and understand how economics, politics, society, religion, and geography are interrelated and impact on history.   

HIST 111 American History II (3 credits)
This course surveys American history from the Reconstruction period following the American Civil War to the Vietnam War. Students will understand the major events that have shaped American history; learn how American cultural values and character have developed as a result of these events; understand how myths and stereotypes about American history affect our perception of the past and present; and analyze and understand how economics, politics, society, religion, and geography are interrelated and impact on history.

MATHEMATICS (MATH)
MATH 106 Applied Mathematics  (3 credits)
Develops fundamental skills for practical applications. Topics include basic arithmetic, measurement, basic algebraic concepts, practical geometry, and solving right triangles using trigonometry.

MATH 111 Business Mathematics  (3 credits)
Mathematical skills necessary to operate a successful office or small business. Percent and simple interest, credit, business ownership, compound interest, payroll and taxes, merchandising, and valuation of assets. Analysis of financial reports and other data, if time permits.

MATH 126  Technical Mathematics I (3 credits)
Introduction to technical mathematics for students in various vocational/technical programs. Designed for students whose academic background does not include algebra or geometry. Includes a review of arithmetic, signed numbers, basic algebra, plane geometry, and other topics. Emphasis is on problem solving.

MATH 131  Intermediate Algebra (3 credits)
Reviews the structure and use of algebra through a combination of topics, including polynomials, first
degree equations, quadratic equations, exponents, radicals, and systems of linear equations. Graphing first and second degree equations is emphasized. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or DMAT 030.

MATH 132 Elementary Geometry (3 credits)
Designed for students who did not have geometry in high school, this course covers plane geometry topics including basic concepts, parallel lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles. Theorems and postulates are included but the emphasis is on measurement and constructions. This course is intended to substitute for Technical Mathematics II, covering the practical geometry that is used in construction majors. Prerequisites: MATH 126 or MATH 131 or instructor permission.

MATH 136  Technical Mathematics II (3 credits)
A continuation of technical mathematics. This course
includes units on quadratic equations, functions, graphing, simultaneous linear equations, geometry, and trigonometry. Emphasis on problem solving and technical applications. Prerequisite: MATH 126 or MATH 131 or instructor permission.


MATH 139 Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
Discrete mathematics is the study of objects that are
distinct and countable or processes that consist of a finite number of steps. This introductory course exposes students to the basic discrete structures and techniques needed to solve practical problems. Topics will include sets, logic, algorithms, numbering systems, counting techniques, discrete probability, and graphs. Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra or MATH 131.

MATH 141 Trigonometry (3 credits)
Shows how mathematics can be applied in a physical setting with the use of trigonometric functions, logarithms, the law of sines, and the law of cosines. Highlighted are the trigonometric functions used to solve right and oblique triangles and the graphing of trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or instructor permission.

MATH 150 Elementary Statistics (3 credits)
Covers measures of central tendency and variability; probability and normal curve; and sampling and hypothesis testing. Students need to possess mathematical skills necessary to do calculations and derivation of basic formulas.

MATH 207 Pre-Calculus (4 credits)
Designed to prepare students for continuation into MATH 215: Calculus. Develops the concepts and proficiencies necessary to work successfully in the areas of elementary functions, theory of equations, inequalities, trigonometric and analytic geometry. Prerequisites: MATH 131, MATH 141.

MATH 215 Calculus (4 credits)
Introduces the concepts and techniques of calculus
beginning with functions and limits. Major emphasis is on theory and applications of the derivative, antiderivative, indefinite integral and definite integral, including
introductory calculus of trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisites: MATH 131, MATH 141; or MATH 207 and instructor permission.

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HEALTH (HEAL)
HEAL 106 Fitness and Wellness (1 credit)
Offers information that enables students to take control of their personal health and lifestyle habits so as to make a continuous, deliberate effort to stay healthy and to achieve well-being. Students will learn to develop personal lifetime programs that promote fitness, preventative health care, and personal wellness.

HEAL 111 Basic First Aid (1 credit)
Provides individuals in the workplace with the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize and provide basic first aid care for injuries and sudden illnesses until advanced medical personnel can arrive and take over assistance. Upon successful completion of the course, each participant will receive an American Red Cross Universal Certificate (indicating First Aid) that will be valid for three years.

PE 106  Weight Training and Physical Conditioning (1 credit)
Instruction in safety and proper lifting techniques for free weights and weight machines. Exercise program geared to the individual. Anatomical and physical aspects of exercise will be studied.

PE 111 Archery (1 credit)
The course covers the fundamentals of shooting the recurve bow. Proper safety techniques are also covered.

PE 116 Golf Skills (1 credit)
Pitching wedge, five iron, and driver are included along with golf terminology. Playing a round of golf is highly recommended.

PE 126 Volleyball (1 credit)
Serving, bump passing, set passing, spiking, scoring, rules, and strategies. Competition in game situations.

PE 131 Fencing (1 credit)
Mechanics of foil fencing. Offensive and defensive manipulation of foil, footwork, compound movements, rules, scoring, and etiquette. Participate in class tournament.


PE 141 Racquet Sports (1 credit)
Fundamental forehand and backhand strokes, serving, rules, scoring, and strategies will be taught for singles, doubles, and cutthroat badminton and racquetball. All students will participate in a single’s challenge match tournament in both sports.

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SCIENCE: ALLIED HEALTH (AH); BIOLOGY (BIO); CHEMISTRY (CHEM); PHYSICAL SCIENCE (PHYS) AND NATURAL SCIENCE (SCI)
AH 106 (3 credits) Introduction to Healthcare  
Addresses the core competencies needed by all health care professionals. Topics common to all health care professions such as communication, infection control, environmental safety, controlling health care costs, professionalism in the workplace, patient assessment and interview, medical chart review, and basic life support are presented. Medical math, written communication, lifestyle management, customer service and tips for securing and maintaining employment are also covered.  Emphasis is placed on the importance of developing the thinking skills and human compassion necessary to a career in health care.

AH 111 (2 credits) Medical Terminology  
An introduction and overview of the medical language frequently encountered by a student in the Allied Health Curriculum, with an emphasis on the basic essential information found in the patient’s chart.  The students will learn by interaction, writing assignments, identifying medical terms commonly found in healthcare.  Case studies will be used as a template to help the student better understand the medical terminology.

BIO 120 (3 credits) Human Biology
This course will introduce the student to human biology.    The students will learn the concepts and science behind the internal workings of the human organism.  This course will cover topics such as chemistry, physics, anatomy & physiology, and how these subjects relate to the study of human biology. 
 
BIO 250 (4 credits) Human Anatomy and Physiology
This course will begin with an introduction to cells and tissues. The basic organ systems will be reviewed. Particular attention will be focused on the cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal and nervous systems. The laboratory portion will provide an understanding of organ system appearance and their interrelation and identification. (As this is a required course for Respiratory Care students, preference will be given to them with regards to registration.) Prerequisite: CHEM 101

BIO 251 (2 credits) Basics of Microbiology and Infection Control
This course will identify the basic definition and description of microorganisms, their identifiable morphology, staining characteristics, and growth requirements. Human infections, particularly those associated with respiratory disorders, will be reviewed. Infection control methods and Standard Precautions will be discussed. Diagnostic procedures for isolating and identifying human infectious agents will be mentioned, particularly as they relate to respiratory disorders. (As this is a required course for Respiratory Care students, preference will be given to them with regards to registration.) Prerequisite: CHEM 101

CHEM 101 Basic Chemistry (3 credits)
This course will include the definition of matter, the elements, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, and liquid mixtures. A section of the course will review important inorganic molecules such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and electrolytes important to the human body. An introduction to organic molecules will define carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. A section on clinical chemistry will discuss fluid and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, nutrition and metabolism, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, and transport. (As this is a required course for Respiratory Care students, preference will be given to them with regards to registration.)

PHYS 100 Application of Physics (2 credits)
This basic physics course will define the states of matter, units of measure, and concepts such as force, stress, pressure, work, compliance, elastance, wall and surface tension, temperature, thermodynamics, and heat exchange. Also included will be an extensive section on gas laws, gas mixtures, humidity and water vapor, gases in solution, and conversion of gas volumes. The laws governing the flow of gases and other liquids will also be reviewed. Included will be techniques for measuring pressure, volume, and flow as they occur in the practice of respiratory care. (As this is a required course for Respiratory Care students, preference will be given to them with regards to registration.) Prerequisite: MATH 121

PHYS 101 How Things Work (4 credits)
This is an introductory physics course that focuses on the ideas, concepts, and engineering behind everyday objects.  The history of these object and their relationships to physical laws will be examined.  Enrolled students will create simple projects to demonstrate their understanding.  Only basic mathematical skills will be required.

PHYS 106  Physics in Everyday Life (3 credits)
Brief overview of physics. Includes motion, work, power, energy, and properties of matter, sound, and light. Electrodynamics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics. Basic mathematical and algebra skills utilized.

PHYS 113 Statics (3 credits)
Elementary, analytical and practical approach to the principles and physical concepts of statics.  Topics include:  Force Systems, Principles of Equilibrium, Structural Analysis of Trusses and Frames, Friction, Centroids, and Moments of Inertia. Prerequisites: Math 131 and Math 141 and/or instructor permission.

PHYS 202 (2 credits) Application of Physical Principles in Respiratory Care
This basic physics course will define the states of matter, units of measure, and concepts such as force, stress, pressure, work, compliance, elastance, wall tension and surface tension, temperature, thermodynamics and heat exchange. Also included will be an extensive section on gas laws, gas mixtures, humidity and water vapor, gases in solution and conversion of gas volumes. The laws governing the flow of gases and other liquids will also be reviewed. Included will be techniques for measuring pressure, volume and flow as they occur in the practice of respiratory care.
PHYS 213 General Physics I (4 credits)
This course is a four credit algebra based physics course in which one of the credits is devoted towards lab work.  The course is an in depth study of statics, kinematics, dynamics, work, power, energy, and the properties of matter. Prerequisites: Math 131 and Math 141 and/or instructor permission.

PHYS 223 General Physics II (4 credits)
Prerequisites: Math 131 and Math 141 and/or instructor permission.

SCI 106 Ecology (3 credits)
Interrelationships between the environment and culture. Different facets of environmental issues. Comprehensive treatment.

SCI 206 Advanced Ecology (3 credits)
Interrelationships between the environment and society. Analysis of contemporary ecological concerns.

SOCIAL SCIENCES: ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT); BUSINESS (BUSN); ECONOMICS (ECON); PSYCHOLOGY (PSY); AND SOCIOLOGY (SOC)
ANT 106 (3 credits) Introduction to Anthropology  
Introduction to anthropology, including various branches. Informed way of looking at and appreciating other cultures. Intensive examination of the Amish.  
 
BUSN 106 (3 credits) Small Business Management  
World of small business. Getting involved as an entrepreneur. Selecting business opportunities. Keeping the business afloat.  

ECON 111 (3 credits) Fundamentals of Economics  
Human occupations with particular reference to economic systems.  

ECON 211 Principles of Economics (3 credits)
Nature and methodology of economics. Mixed capitalism and market economy; national income and employment theory. Economics of fiscal policy. Money, banking, and the Federal Reserve System.  
 
PSY 116 (3 credits) Introduction to Psychology  
Major specialties of the field and assumptions upon which based. Techniques used by psychologists.  

SOC 001 (3 credits) Professional Development Skills  
The course covers topics essential to survive in today’s work force: employment search and application techniques, résumé development, acceptable behavior, job knowledge and expectations, and professional telephone speaking skills.

SOC 106 Principles of Sociology (3 credits)
Systematic interpretation of major elements of sociology. Social dynamics, deviant behavior, social and cultural change, and developing major social trends.  

SOC 121 Critical Thinking (3 credits)
Provides an introduction to critical reading, writing, and thinking. Encourages students to pose questions at appropriate times and to have a generally critical attitude toward advertising and other aspects of popular culture.  

SOC 206 (3 credits) Sociology of Deviant Behavior  
Deviant social behavior. Development of deviant individual’s personality. Deviant careers; conflicts between the deviant’s and the normative social world. Social techniques and patterns used to resolve such conflicts are also covered.   

SOC 216 Multiculturalism (3 credits)
Introduction to general issues regarding cultural diversity. A focus on complex and diverse group activities in the contemporary workplace with an emphasis on coping skills with persons from different ethic, gender, religious, and professional backgrounds and perspectives.  

SOC 221 Marriage and the Family (3 credits)
Contemporary American marriage and family patterns. Historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Current trends toward urbanization and changing value systems. Cultural, psychological, and social factors involved in the changing American family.

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PRE-MAJOR COURSES
As a prerequisite of academic courses, students enrolled in fundamental reading, writing, and/or mathematics courses are required to earn at least a ‘C’ grade in order to matriculate into a technical program.

DENG 012 Concepts of English: Intensive review and drill in grammar, usage, and sentence/paragraph construction. For students whose test scores and/or writing performance indicate need for improvement in composition skills. Course must be taken before English 106 Composition and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Concepts of English is a one semester course that is offered each semester and during each summer term.

DENG 014 Developmental Reading: Developmental reading focuses on the development and improvement of reading skills. For students whose test scores indicate need for improvement in reading skills and strategies. Course must be taken before English 106 Composition and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Developmental Reading is a one semester course that is offered each semester and during each summer term.

DENG 020 Basic Writing I: Intensive review and drill in grammar, usage, and sentence/paragraph construction. For students whose test scores and/or writing performance indicate need for improvement in basic composition skills. Course must be taken before DENG 021 Basic Writing II and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Basic Writing I is the first part of a yearlong  course that is only offered in the fall semester.

DENG 021 Basic Writing II: Intensive review and drill in grammar, usage, and sentence/paragraph construction. The second part of a two-semester course for students whose test scores and/or writing performance indicate need for improvement in basic composition skills. Course must be taken after DENG 020 basic Writing I and before ENG 106 Composition and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Basic Writing II is the second part of a yearlong course that is only offered in the spring semester.

DENG 025   Basic Reading I: Development and improvement of reading skills. For students whose test scores indicate the need for improvement in basic reading skills and strategies.  Course must be taken before DENG 026 Basic Reading II and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Basic Reading I is the first part of a yearlong course that is only offered in the fall semester.

DENG 026  Basic Reading II: Continuation of development and improvement of reading skills. The second part of a two-semester course for students whose test scores indicate need for improvement in basic reading skills and strategies. Course must be taken after DENG 025 Basic Reading I and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Basic Reading II is the second part of a yearlong course that is only offered in the spring semester.

DMAT 010
 Fundamentals of Mathematics: Development and improvement of math skills. Fundamentals of Mathematics covers whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent, measurement, and various other essential topics. For students whose test scores indicate the need for development and/or improvement in fundamental math skills, course must be taken before MATH 126 Technical Mathematics I and MATH 111 Business Mathematics, and DMAT 030 Introduction to Algebra. DMAT 010 may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Fundamentals of Mathematics is a one semester course that is offered each semester and during each summer term.

DMAT 020  Basic Mathematics I: Development and improvement of math skills. Basic Mathematics I covers whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. The emphasis is on understanding the meaning of numbers, developing an ability to estimate answers, and working with rulers and linear measurement. For students whose test scores indicate the need for development and/or improvement in basic math skills.  Course must be taken before DMAT 021 Basic Mathematics II and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Basic Mathematics I is the first part of a yearlong course that is only offered in the fall semester. 

DMAT 021  Basic Mathematics II: Development and improvement of mathse skills.  Basic Mathematics II consists of topics from beginning Algebra and practical Geometry. The emphasis is on computation of fractions and decimals (with and without a calculator) as well as solving practical problems involving measurement and percent.  For students whose test scores indicate the need for development and/or improvement in basic math skills.  Course must be taken after DMAT 020 Basic Mathematics I and may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Basic Mathematics II is the second part of a yearlong course that is only offered in the spring semester.

DMAT 030 Introduction to Algebra: Development and improvement of algebra skills required in vocational/technical occupations. Introduction to Algebra includes topics in real numbers, solving first degree equations, exponents, polynomials, and factoring.  For students whose test scores indicate the need for development and/or improvement in algebraic math skills, course must be taken before MATH 131 Intermediate Algebra. DMAT 030 may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Introduction to Algebra is a one semester course that is offered each semester and during each summer term.

OTHER
DSOC 010Success Strategies
: Development and improvement of skills and strategies associated with collegiate success. Success Strategies encourages students to live healthy life-styles, develop academic skills, foster habits of punctuality, and maintain good attendance records in all classes. Three critical components of collegiate success are time management, positive attitude, and goal orientation. Required for students whose test scores indicate placement in DENG 025 Basic Reading I and an elective for all others. DSOC 010 may not be used to meet certificate or degree requirements. Success Strategies is a one semester course that is offered in the fall semester.

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